Vyana

Vyana

Life sustaining energy of the heart and lungs; the second of the five airs of Ayurvedic philosophy; the life force governing circular motion.
Mentioned in: Polarity Therapy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Prana se asocia con la obediencia, apana con el medrar, samana con la solidaridad, udana con el sentido de superioridad y vyana con la devocion y el amor.
Livro da Receita e Despesa da vyla de Vyana de 1530, No.
In its chapter on internal agnihotra, Sankhayana Aranyaka 10 states: "His expiration is the Ahavaniya (fire), his inspiration the Garhaptya, his Vyana the Anvaharyapacana .
19-23 where mouthfuls of food are offered to the five breaths: out-breath, inter-breath, in-breath, link-breath, and up-breath (prana, vyana, apana, samana, udana).
Each bodily function or locus of bodily functions had a wind or breath that acted as its motivator, giving rise to innumerable vital breaths, which eventually became codified into five basic bodily winds: prana, apana, vyana, udana and samana.
vyana, the "diffused breath," circulates in the limbs and motivates their movement.
The sequence of their pairings are as follows: prana and vyana;(27) prana, apana, vyana;(28) prana, apana, vyana, samana, as bodily parts;(29) and prana, apana, vyana, udana, as bodily parts.
For the vratya, each of the three winds, prana, apana and vyana, consists of seven types delineated by correspondences typical of the ritual process.
52) Formulaic utterances involving two (prana, apana), three (prana, udana/ apana, vyana), four (prana, apana, vyana, udana), and five (prana, apana, vyana, udana, samana) winds are commonly employed.
rinse out his mouth), offer oblations with greetings to each of the five bodily winds (prana, apana, vyana, udana and samana), eat the remainder of the offering, wash out his mouth again, and meditate on the atman with the following mantra:
vyana moves in the channels of the body, all of which originate in the heart, the seat of atman.
Elsewhere, the five bodily winds are equated with the five vital functions through the Agnihotra sacrifice: prana corresponds to sight, vyana to hearing, apana to speech, samana to mind, and udana to wind (breath).