voyeur

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voy·eur

(voy-yur'),
One who practices voyeurism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

voyeur

(voi-yûr′)
n.
Psychology A person who derives sexual gratification from covert observation of an unsuspecting person who is naked, undressing, or engaging in sexual activity.

voy·eur′ism n.
voy′eur·is′tic adj.
voy′eur·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

voyeur

A person who achieves sexual gratification from watching others naked, undressing and/or performing sexual acts.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

voy·eur

(vwah-yur')
One who practices voyeurism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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One fear is that voyeurs or those harboring a grudge could instantly post such photos on the Internet.
Eugene's most prolific video voyeur will enter the national spotlight when television personality John Walsh, of "America's Most Wanted" fame, features William Joseph Green's obsessive stalking and taping of an estimated 125 young girls in an episode of his talk show.
This is where the Song leads us, to union with the lover who has the greatest possible significance for us--we who are not voyeurs of this text.
Adia Millett's The Comfort of Synthetic Divinity, 2001-2002, recalls Duchamp's Etant donnes, as viewers are made into voyeurs, looking through a window on a small scene constructed in one wall (sparkling electric flowers inside even resemble the shining filaments of Duchamp's kitsch waterfall).
As a consequence we have degenerated into a society of voyeurs, sitting on the sidelines, brainwashed and conditioned by a daily dose of vacuous glossy magazines, tabloid trivia and television pap.
For a monthly charge of US$24.95, "voyeurs" will be able to observe the young women eating, sleeping, bathing and playing, and for an additional US$10 they can chat with them in English or in Spanish.
Alarmed at the idea of preteens with access to pornographic channels and chat rooms, or youngsters visiting the Web sites of exhibitionist coeds, a growing number of folks express fears that we may be raising a generation of voyeurs. Whatever happened, one hears an occasional middle-aged parent complain, to the notion of "custody of the eyes," the idea (as the textbooks on moral theology used to put it) that it was "immodest to permit the eyes to roam without any control whatsoever, disregarding the menace of temptation"?
The real stars of any festival, in my book, are the documentaries, especially when they star Advocate columnist and faux blond Bruce Vilanch (Get Bruce) or a mother-son team of voyeurs who deified musclemen in the '50s (Beefcake, by Thom Fitzgerald, director of The Hanging Garden).