euthanasia

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euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

euthanasia

Mercy killing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Jack Kevorkian has been careful never to practice active voluntary euthanasia (all the people he helped die by suicide performed "the last act" themselves), he appeared in the opening segment.
The advocates of euthanasia assert that the right to self-determination is the basis and justification of voluntary euthanasia. Those who recognize the right to self-determination supposedly recognize eo ipso the right to voluntary euthanasia.
The third observation is that the policy applies only to assisted suicide and does not deal with voluntary euthanasia. (60) Although this arose because of the way in which the policy was produced in response to the Purdy decision, we consider that differentiating between voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide is not justifiable for four reasons.
I suspect that, above all, mainstream politicians fear religious institutions that oppose voluntary euthanasia, even though individual believers often do not follow their religious leaders' views.
The Netherlands has moved from assisted suicide to euthanasia, from euthanasia for people who are terminally ill to euthanasia for people who are chronically ill, from euthanasia for physical illnesses to euthanasia for psychological distress, and from voluntary euthanasia to involuntary euthanasia (called "termination of the patient without explicit request").
The essence of Downie's position is that voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide should be treated, in law, in the same fashion as the withholding and withdrawing of life-sustaining treatment (47).
This article further evaluates Americans' attitudes toward euthanasia by examining the following questions: What are Americans' attitudes toward voluntary euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, foregoing life-sustaining treatment, and end-of-life decisions?
I HAVE been a member of the Voluntary Euthanasia Society (now renamed Dignity in Dying) for many years and was with my wife when she died at home of cancer of the oesophagus the Christmas before last aged 89.
80), apparently intended as a serious critique of the issue of voluntary euthanasia (VE), is a classic example of 'playing the man' rather than 'playing the ball'.
The divorced father-of-three, who was also kicked out by the Voluntary Euthanasia Society, lives in Cranleigh, Surrey.
Published in the journal Palliative Medicine, the survey showed 0.16% of the 585,000 deaths in 2004, or 936, were described by doctors as voluntary euthanasia.

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