volatile

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volatile

 [vol´ah-til]
evaporating rapidly; vaporizing readily at low temperatures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vol·a·tile (vol.),

(vol'ă-til),
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

volatile

(vŏl′ə-tl, -tīl′)
adj.
Chemistry
a. Evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressures.
b. Capable of being readily vaporized.

vol′a·tile n.
vol′a·til′i·ty (-tĭl′ĭ-tē), vol′a·tile·ness (-tl-nĭs, -tīl′-) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vol·a·tile

(vol'ă-til)
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Volatile

Something that vaporizes or evaporates quickly when exposed to air.
Mentioned in: Aromatherapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

vol·a·tile

(vol'ă-til)
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A decrease in total gas and methane production by plant extracts could be mediated through: (i) a reduction in protozoa and/or methanogen populations associated with the protozoa surface (Patra and Saxena 2009; Cieslak et al., 2012); (ii) a direct inhibition of methanogen population (Zmora et al., 2012); (iii) changes in volatile fatty acids profile and the acetate to propionate ratio (Busquet et al., 2006) and (iv) inhibition of fibrolytic enzymes activity and thus the feed digestibility (Patra et al., 2010).
Total and individual volatile fatty acid (mM/L) production acetate to propionate ratio (A:P) and
Energy metabolism of volatile fatty acids from the gastrointestinal tract in various species.
Gas profiles assay and volatile fatty acid (VFA): The headspace gas in the serum bottle was collected for analyzing methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen by gas chromatography (GC-2010, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) equipped with column (Shincarbon ST.
Effect of nitrate on ruminal volatile fatty acid production and milk composition.
Faecal samples were prepared for volatile fatty acid (VFA) analysis by mixing 0.4 g of faeces with 0.2 mL of 25% (w/v) metaphosphoric acid and 2 mL of water.
Volatile fatty acid analysis: Samples of digesta from the cecum and colon of individual pigs were taken for the analysis of volatile fatty acids.
The SRL samples were analyzed for individual and total volatile fatty acids with DANI make Gas Chromatograph (Model 1000, Series 011124002, DANI, Cologno, Monzese Italy) using flame ionizing detector (FID), programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector and capillary column (SP-Packed column 10% SP-1000, 2 mm length).
A part of this ethanol is metabolized by rumen bacteria (Moomaw and Hungate, 1963) mainly forming acetate (Czerkawski and Breckenridge, 1972) and, to a lesser extent to the other volatile fatty acids (Pradhan and Hemken, 1970).
"The consumption of too many ripe fruits might contribute to rapid overfermentation and the overproduction of volatile fatty acids, leading to an increase in acid levels in animals' body," Nishi explained.
Volatile fatty acids are considered one of the essential nutrient for animal's health.