void

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void

 [void]
double void a technique of bladder training useful for those with urinary retention; the patient is taught to urinate, relax for five minutes, and repeat urination. A patient who is performing glucose examinations of the urine should test the second specimen.

void

(voyd),
To evacuate urine or feces.

void

(void)
v.
To excrete body wastes.
adj.
Containing no matter; empty.

void

verb To urinate

void

(voyd)
To evacuate urine or feces.

Void

To empty the bladder.
Mentioned in: Bed-Wetting

void

(voyd)
To evacuate urine or feces.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Ch'ag' signifies Voidness; "gya' Liberation from samsara; and 'ch'en-po' the great attainment of unification (zung.jug, yuganad-dha), that is the unification of the realisation of Voidness and Liberation from samsara.
Among the art world's "masters of voidness," painter Ad Reinhardt's adulatory term for Joyce, among others, was Reinhardt himself.
When perfected it becomes the wisdom of understanding Identitylessness and Voidness, thus accepting the actual way in which all things exist and rejecting false distorted notions of true independent identities and existence.
So, the teaching of voidness does not really mean that everything is nothing but that everything is empty of being whatever one thin it is.
It profoundly uses onsite trashing conventional ritual occasions and forms and systems through which social substance is infrastructurally bolstered to force pitiless confrontation with out-there voidness. Listeners composers performers undergoing extreme exertion or even more extreme nonexertion under the unyielding imperative of strenuous rigors meticulously detailed, stringently demanding, random-processually generated, globally undecipherable.
Automatic voidness under article 85(2) would, however, apply solely to the notice period clause and not to the whole conference agreement in which it is included since it is normally severable from the agreement.
1) William Blake's cosmological idea of the "Sea of Time and Space," which was a direct reference to the physical cosmic space filled with stars and planets hung in immense voidness and evolving through time; the "sea of Space" thus pointed to the unfathomably deep matrix of spatial creation (space as a female principle, identified in the mythology with Enitharmon); the "sea of Time" pointed to the unfathomably deep matrix of becoming or evolution; the two, space and time, however, could exist only together, as the couple formed by Enitharmon-Space and Los-Time, they being the parents of Orc, or the inner energy of time, a symbol of eternal Revolution; in this Blakean equation, time was seen as being finite, while space was infinite: the two formed a "finitely infinite" unity;
For instance, for the phrase [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in "Record One," Broughton gives: "Discrimination is a void dharma, but common men are broiled by it." Faure renders the same phrase with the more felicitous "La discrimination n'est qu'un dharma vide, mais l'homme du commun est consume par elle." For the passage in "Record Two," [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]...Broughton twists the English to match the Chinese, rendering the passage: "As medicine to counteract existence, [the Mahayana] speak the medicine of voidness and nonexistence.
Given these difficulties, the major translations of the term "sunyata" have varied and have included such English expressions as "emptiness," "nothingness," "nonsubstantiality," "relativity," and "voidness."(1) Sunyata has also been described as referring to (1) a religious attitude or state of awareness; (2) a focus of meditation; (3) a manner of ethical action; or (4) a statement about reality, such as corresponding to the Buddhist notion of the interrelated nature of all existing things (pratitya samutpada).(2)
"Buddhadasa Bhikkhu: Life and Society through the Natural Eyes of Voidness." In Engaged Buddhism: Buddhist Liberation Movements in Asia, edited by Christopher S.
By arresting both breath and mind through controlled respiration, the objects of the senses are restrained and a continued voidness of conception ensues, leading ultimately to the fourth superconscious condition (turya, turiya) in which one's soul (atman) is free to dwell with the universal spirit (brahman).
The vacuity intuited by Ahab, and later by Pierre too in his view of the human soul as an endless "shaft" (see infra the fragment beginning "Deep, deep, and still deep and deeper," HMP: 402; Book XXI, II), remind us strangely of the most modern physical theories, according to which material atoms are made up mostly of empty space (99.99999% of matter is sheer voidness; see the quantum gravity theory expounded by Nassim Haramein, 2011 and 2012), and of other similar philosophies of the "Maya" type--the Hindoo material universal "veil" of cosmic "illusion."