voodoo

(redirected from Vodou)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

voodoo

(voo′doo″) [Louisiana Fr. voudou, ult. fr a West African language, e.g., Fon or Ewe vodũ, spirit, deity, demon]
1. A religion that combines elements of Roman Catholicism with traditional African religion, magic, ritual, and witchcraft, primarily practiced in the coastal regions of the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean Islands, esp. Haiti.
2. One who practices this religion.
3. A charm or fetish used in this religion.
4. A colloquial, disparaging term for nonsensical, simplistic, irrational, or superstitious activities or practices, e.g., "voodoo economics" or "voodoo science."
References in periodicals archive ?
Vodou in the Caribbean was thus influenced by native Taino (Arawak) Indian folk practices, particularly medicines and cult objects, such as the Zemi.
However, for the most part, the field slaves and maroons, because of their relative isolation from whites, domestic slaves, gens de couleur, and free Blacks, were interpellated and ounganified/manboified by the modes of production, language, ideology, ideological apparatuses, and communicative discourse of the Vodou Ethic and the spirit of communism, and many sought to reproduce their African ways of life in a national position of their own.
(19) This paper provides a good discussion of the complex belief systems in Vodou related to the migration of spirits following death.
"A Sorcerer's Bottle: The Visual Art of Magic in Haiti." In Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou, edited by Donald Cosentino, 305-21.
The Vodou elements of cannibalism and zombification, mainly through U.S.
Because it is unfair to think of Haitian art, religion, and life as, in sum, a culture "more oral than written." To many, that means "primitive." The emphasis on myth might seem too similar to the sweeping generalizations of declasse writers like Joseph Campbell or, worse, might recall the strategy of "Papa Doc" Duvalier's Africanizing project, which grew out of the griot movement in the 1930s and exploited the literary aspects of Vodou. A popular anglophone audience will not likely have those associations.
it is significant, or in any case, symptomatic, that this occupation was preceded, accompanied, and followed by a series of racist diagrams and images of Vodou which were deployed in the United States.
* Religion: 80 percent Catholic, followed by Protestant, Vodou, Ba'hai, and Muslim
In the contexts of colonialism and discourse over the concept of a "global" mental health, i.e., the exporting of Western psychiatry to "third world" countries, contributors discuss the evolution of indigenous healing traditions in the Caribbean; cultural/spiritual practices relating to mental health (e.g., Obeah, Vodou, Santeria, Spiritism); and integration of these multicultural traditions with Western practice.
Moreover, the region's Vodou religion speaks through Edouard's intricately beaded and sequined drapos, or flags, that traditionally honor different Vodou gods.
It extends to religion, particularly the tension and sometimes open conflict between Christianity and Vodou, as Jason Barr explores.