viscosity

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Related to Viscous Force: Reynolds number, Inertial force, inertia force

viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

/vis·cos·i·ty/ (vis-kos´ĭ-te) resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

viscosity

[viskos′itē]
Etymology: L, viscosus, sticky
the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. A solution that has high viscosity is relatively thick and flows slowly because of the adhesive effect of adjacent molecules. - viscid, viscous, adj.

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.

viscosity (vis·kôˑ·s·tē),

n the degree of resistance of a liquid to flow.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, note that these authors failed to predict the total axial force because they ignored the viscous forces of the air and did not incorporate the boundary layer of the jet in their analysis.
If the inertial force is negligible as the case of Region I, Re is small and viscous force is competing with surface tension on the establishment of a steady coating bead.
v] viscous force g gravity H coating gap h minimum wet thickness [L.
When the initial air thickness is large, the viscous forces generated by air are small and the same results are obtained as in Fig.
Viscous forces, already high for swimming sperm (described later), are enhanced in close proximity to the capillary walls, so we measured swimming speeds in the center of the tube.
H])] Capillary Number (Nc) v[mu]/[sigma] 1E- Ratio of viscous forces 8~5E-6 to capillary forces ([N.
Because of the centrifugal and viscous forces acting on the liquid compounds, molecules adhere to the substrate much faster than in the dipping process.
It was shown that drop deformation is the result of a local balance between interfacial and viscous forces, which is changing with position along the drop surface due to shear-thinning.
Flake-like particles can move like leaves in the wind if they can be lifted by viscous forces or pushed by pigging.
One simple way to analyze the fluid flow around the aesthetascs is to calculate the Reynolds number, a dimensionless parameter that indicates the relative importance of inertial and viscous forces in a given flow situation, and thus affects odorant access.