central obesity

(redirected from Visceral adiposity)

central obesity

Obesity defined as increased waist-to-hip and waist-to-thigh ratios, waist circumference and sagittal abdominal diameter, which is accompanied by an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

central obesity

Abdominal obesity, truncal obesity Obesity defined by an ↑ waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-thigh ratio, waist circumference, and sagittal abdominal diameter, and linked to an ↑ risk of cardiovascular events. See Body mass index, Obesity.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fructose consumption: potential mechanisms for its effects to increase visceral adiposity and induce dyslipidemia and insulin resistance.
There was also about a 40 per cent increase in visceral adiposity, fat around the belly and the organs inside the abdominal cavity, which is considered particularly unhealthy in adolescents with the upward versus downward BMI trajectory.
" The study did not account for change in BMI over the course of follow-up, nor did it use data on fat distribution or the degree of visceral adiposity, the researchers noted.
Lee and colleagues (2013) agree that the use of aerobic exercise among obese adolescents reduces visceral adiposity. In their study, 44 African Americans and Caucasian obese girls ages 12 to 18 years were randomized to a program of either aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, or no exercising groups without calorie restriction for 3 months.
Clinical significance of visceral adiposity assessed by computed tomography: A Japanese perspective.
The visceral adiposity index (VAI) is proposed to be a simple and low-cost tool for the evaluation of adipose tissue dysfunction and its associated cardiometabolic risk in adult population (5).
Visceral adiposity is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and increased cardiovascular risk.
In addition, the visceral adiposity index (VAI) and subcutaneous adiposity index (SAI) were calculated by dividing the surface area of these tissues at the L3 level by height squared.
reported that depressive symptoms may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by increasing visceral adipocytes in middle-aged women.28 However, waist circumference is not a good indicator for visceral adiposity and is highly correlated with BMI (r=0.93).
Lipid accumulation product and visceral adiposity index are effective markers for identifying the metabolically obese normal-weight phenotype.