virulence factors

virulence factors

Factors essential for the pathogenicity of bacteria. In the case of Vibrio cholerae , for instance, the virulence factors are cholera toxin and the toxin coregulated pilus which is necessary for V. cholerae to colonize the intestine. A small molecule has been found that can inhibit the production of both of these factors without affecting the reproduction of the organism.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The topics include the innate immune system: always on guard, the microbiota of the human body: microbiomes and beyond, identifying virulence factors: molecular approaches for host factors, antimicrobial compounds and their targets, and the changing roles of microbiologists in an age of bioterrorism and emerging diseases.
coli in water buffalos, this study sought to determine the (i) virulence factors involved, (ii) phylogenetic groups involved, and (iii) relationships between pathovars and phylogenetic groups of E.
Multiplex PCR was used to detect genes encoding for 11 frequently encountered extraintestinal virulence factors (sfa/foc, papC, papGII, papGIII, fyuA, iroN, aer, traT, neuC, hlyC, and cnf1), which belong to the main classes of virulence factors (adhesins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and protectins) (11).
coli is mainly related to its virulence factors, which are associated with host colonization and invasion, tissue damage, stimulation of inflammatory response, evasion of immune response, and biofilm formation.
The infections could be more severe in immune-suppressed individuals like cancer and neutropenic patients.2 Various virulence factors are produced by P.
Molecular detection of virulence factors genes among Enterobacteriaceae isolates.
[1] Its pathogenesis is associated with the expression of a variety of structural and secreted virulence factors that enable host colonisation, invasion of tissue and dissemination.
(2) Virulence factors, which responsible for invasion, extraintestinal spread, and intracellular survival, are encoded by genes located in the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI).
Further studies are needed to define pathogenesis, virulence factors, and predisposing conditions associated with this microorganism.
The purpose of this review is to trace the history of STEC, describe the relationship between major virulence factors and pathology, comment on disease course and current therapy, and discuss the epidemiology of these pathogens in New Zealand and elsewhere, highlighting distinctive differences.