virtue

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Related to Virtue theory: deontological theory

virtue

 [vir´choo]
in bioethics, a trait of character that disposes a person habitually to excellence of intent and performance with respect to the telos proper to life as a human being or to a specific activity or role in life. Some virtues (such as cleanliness) are important socially rather than morally. (See also morality.) Virtues in medicine include trustworthiness, compassion, phronesis, justice, fortitude, temperance, integrity, and self-effacement.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although what I have offered is far from a geometric proof, I have tried to show that the combined resources of Thomistic action analysis, theological and philosophical anthropology, and virtue theory offer a powerful explanation for the basic teaching of the much-contested encyclical HV.
(7) For example, Aristotelian virtue theory (8) emphasizes the reciprocal relationship between an agent's character and his or her action.
Thomas's analysis of the virtue of studiositas and the vice of curiositas establishes an interconnection between the intellectual and the moral, the way in which knowledge is "self-implicating." Yet there is an important disparity between Zagzebski's contemporary virtue theory and Aquinas's view.
The second form, which he suggests is possessed by his version of virtue theory, involves equal concern for the agent and others considered as a class.
As we have seen, the goal or target or aim of virtue theory in ethics is to produce a good and flourishing human person.
By incorporating striking modern exemplars and discussions of the contemporary applications of Aquinas's virtue theory, Austin succeeds in providing a holistic causal analysis of virtue that is conversant with the concerns of contemporary society.
McGrath refers to virtue theory twice in his article, including a differentiation of character and skills development, and a comment about "essential elements of character" (p.
While virtue theory, broadly considered, is the central approach to ethics for most of the thinkers throughout the Greek and Roman world, Aristotle's account is among the most prominent, and philosophers who come after him presuppose aspects of his view even when they attempt to depart from it.
The opening of this article explores historical trends in the development of virtue theory that support this option.
Books on virtue ethics often have misleading titles that imply that growth of moral character is the topic at hand when in fact the book addresses specific virtues or virtue theory in general.
Virtue theory explains how we can become more moral and perhaps why we would choose to do so.
John O'Neill (1998) contrasts Benson's virtue theory model with the more commonly encountered false dichotomy between autonomy and heteronomy.