Vietnam syndrome


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Psychiatry A popular term for the psychosocial consequences of active participation in the Vietnam conflict—e.g., substance abuse, depression
Sociology A term used in political analysis to describe the impact of the controversy over the Vietnam War on US foreign policy after 1975
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Vietnam syndrome

Psychiatry A popular term for the psychosocial consequences of active participation in the Vietnam conflict–eg, substance abuse, depression. See Burned-out syndrome, Post-traumatic stress disorder. Cf Gulf War syndrome.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having ignominiously lost the war in Vietnam in 1975, not long afterwards it was invading other countries and agonising about overcoming the 'Vietnam syndrome'.
Moreover, the war's legacy lingered in the guise of a 'Vietnam syndrome', characterised by Washington's reluctance to intervene and risk American lives in external conflicts that could not easily be explained as directly related to concrete national interests--a recurring constraint to the present.
"Vietnam syndrome" restricted our foreign conflicts, for a time, to such swift and relatively petty adventures as 1983's post-coup invasion of Grenada (which, though it involved fewer than 8,000 U.S.
The inclusion of Vietnam vets in the parades not only afforded them a belated welcome home, but also underlined the administration's point that the victory in Kuwait had, in the words of Bush, "kicked the Vietnam syndrome for once and for all".
All too many American interventions in the past 40 years, notwithstanding periodic breast-beating about the "Vietnam syndrome," indicate that the lessons of the unnecessary conflict in Indochina remain largely unlearned.
"And, by God, we've kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all." He was referring to a problem that had embarrassed the country since it fled Vietnam in defeat and disgrace almost two decades earlier.
Historian Walter Hixson, of the University of Akron, examines how Americans have emphasized healing and overcoming the Vietnam Syndrome through a variety of means, but most interestingly through film, which tends to focus on the American soldier as victim and the Vietnamese as nearly invisible.
The volume covers a diverse range of transnational topics that go beyond state-to-state relations, including the environmental consequences of the war, "Vietnam Syndrome" in the United States, cinematic influences, and trade.
The dynamism and passion of the movement in the 1960s and 1970s was snuffed out by a right-leaning Catholic hierarchy, diminished by the so-called "Vietnam Syndrome," which numbed Americans into a collective amnesia about the war, and stymied by growing passivity among Catholics--priests, religious, and lay people.
forces appeared to vindicate Powell's strategy, but, almost as important, it allowed the president to declare that the United States had "kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all" (Bush 1991).
Although military victory (and an overwhelming one at that) defined the success of this coalition, it also allowed many of the senior personnel who fought in Southeast Asia to state with confidence, "We've kicked the Vietnam Syndrome once and for all!" (p.
It is said that it took a president like Ronald Reagan in the 1980s for the United States to overcome the "Vietnam syndrome."

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