Gillick competence

(redirected from Victoria Gillick)

Gillick competence

A UK term of art referring to the competence of a child under the age of 16 to consent to his/her own medical care, without the need for parental permission.

The Gillick standard arose from the High Court’s decision in Gillick v West Norfolk and Wisbech Area Health Authority [1985] 3 All ER 402 (HL), which is binding in the UK and approved in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In this landmark case, Mrs Gillick, a mother of 10, took the West Norfolk and Wisbech Health Authority to court for issuing a circular advising doctors on providing contraception to minors (here, under age 16), which the Authority left up to the doctor’s discretion. Mrs Gillick argued that parental rights trumped consent where the child in question was under age 16. The court responded by saying that parental rights do not exist. Gillick competence is of interest to pathologists in the UK as related to the Human Tissue Act 2004.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Catholic mother of ten, Victoria Gillick, lost a case in the High Court of Justice against the DHSS.
Victoria Gillick, ran an active campaign against the policy.
VICTORIA Gillick found herself in the media spotlight on July 26, 1983 when she failed to prevent doctors prescribing contraception to under-16s without parental consent.
The Fraser Guidelines arose from a case involving Victoria Gillick who went to court to prevent medics giving under-16s contraception without parental permission.
But morals campaigner Victoria Gillick moaned: "While I am all for children being rewarded, this could end up costing a lot of money.
33 MOTHER of 10 Victoria Gillick won a 1983 court case to stop the Department of Health allowing the Pill to be prescribed to girls under 16 without their parents' consent.
The guidance replaced earlier Government advice in the wake of a case brought by Catholic mother Victoria Gillick over the prescription of the pill to under-16s.
Morality campaigner Victoria Gillick said children were being harmed by propaganda about contraception.
Family campaigner Victoria Gillick described the grant as "absolutely outrageous".
Other speakers include family campaigner Victoria Gillick and Prof Joel Brind from the City University of New York, who has carried out research into links between induced abortion and breast cancer.
She once hurled a typewriter at editor Peter Stanford when he wanted to publish a letter from Victoria Gillick, a prominent right-winger, mother of 10, describing her as "that silly young woman with the wrong attitude to birth control."
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