victim

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victim

One who suffers an injustice at another's hand. See Fashion victim.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Patient discussion about victim

Q. How can we prevent this bipolar disorder spreading to my family members. Am Mickey 29 year old, I lost my father who died as a victim of Bipolar disorder, because of this now I am afraid that this bipolar could again attack any one of my family members. Is there any chance for bipolar again, if it so, how can we prevent this bipolar disorder spreading to my family members?

A. Welcome Micky,
I am so sorry to hear that your father did not win his battle with bipolar disorder.
Bipolar disorder is thought to have strong genetic links so it is possible that another person in your family may develop sypmtoms of this illness, having said that it is not contageous. Take the situation with your dad into consideration if someone else in your family does develop symptoms of bipolar disorder and get them the professional help that they will need to effectivly manage the illness. GP's and family doctors do not have the tools and knowledge to effectivly treat bipolar disorder, so getting that family memeber involved with a psychiatrist and involved with the mental health community would be a vital step in learning to manage the illness. Bipolar disorder does not have to be fatal. It can be managed. A combination of the right medications, theropy, good diet, plenty of sleep, exercise, meditation etc... can all lead to a healthy and happy life for a person with BP.

More discussions about victim
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References in classic literature ?
I could not sustain the horror of my situation, and when I perceived that the popular voice and the countenances of the judges had already condemned my unhappy victim, I rushed out of the court in agony.
Soon after we heard that the poor victim had expressed a desire to see my cousin.
Unable to accomplish this, he nevertheless, as a matter of principle, continued his habits of social familiarity with the old man, and thus gave him constant opportunities for perfecting the purpose to which -- poor forlorn creature that he was, and more wretched than his victim -- the avenger had devoted himself.
Now they had tied their poor victim to a great post near the center of the village, directly before Mbonga's hut, and here they formed a dancing, yelling circle of warriors about him, alive with flashing knives and menacing spears.
The body yielded to the currents of air, and though no murmur or groan escaped the victim, there were instants when he grimly faced his foes, and the anguish of cold despair might be traced, through the intervening distance, in possession of his swarthy lineaments.
It remained to ascertain whether the priests were watching by the side of their victim as assiduously as were the soldiers at the door.
His screams of rage were frightful as he dashed hither and thither, dealing terrific blows with his giant weapon, or sinking his yellow fangs into the flesh of some luckless victim. And during it the priestess stood with poised knife above Tarzan, her eyes fixed in horror upon the maniacal thing that was dealing out death and destruction to her votaries.
Before Rokoff could drive the weapon home the chief sprang upon him and dragged him away from his intended victim.
During this gayety, a man in the livery of the city, short of stature and robust of mien, mounted the platform and placed himself near the victim. His name speedily circulated among the spectators.
As I was groping to remove the chain from about my victim's neck I glanced up into the darkness to see six pairs of gleaming eyes fixed, unwinking, upon me.
He was a tall, handsome man, and when he drew himself to his full height and turned those gray eyes on the victim of his wrath, as he did that day, he was very imposing.
He destroys birth and death, and dissipates to mist the paradox of being, until his victim cries out, as in "The City of Dreadful Night": "Our life's a cheat, our death a black abyss." And the feet of the victim of such dreadful intimacy take hold of the way of death.