Vibrio


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Vibrio

 [vib´re-o]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, straight or curved rod-shaped bacteria. V. cho´lerae is the etiologic agent of Asiatic cholera; V. metschniko´vii causes gastroenteritis; V. parahaemoly´ticus causes gastroenteritis due to the consumption of raw or improperly cooked seafood (especially in Japan); and V. vulni´ficus causes septicemia and cellulitis in persons who have consumed raw seafood.

vibrio

 [vib´re-o]
an organism of the genus Vibrio, or other spiral motile organism.
cholera vibrio Vibrio cholerae.
noncholera v's a group of microorganisms that are similar to Vibrio cholerae but differ from it immunologically and having variable pathogenic properties. Many that were isolated from water or from the feces of individuals with mild diarrheal disease have been named for the place of their discovery, such as V. danu´bicus, V. ghin´da, and V. massau´ah.

Vibrio

(vib'rē-ō),
A genus of motile (occasionally nonmotile), nonsporeforming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria (family Spirillaceae) containing short (0.5-3.0 mcm), curved or straight rods that occur singly or which are occasionally united into S-shapes or spirals. Motile cells contain a single polar flagellum; in some species, two or more flagella occur in one polar tuft. Some of these organisms are saprophytes in salt and fresh water and in soil; others are parasites or pathogens. The type species is Vibrio cholerae.
[L. vibro, to vibrate]

vib·ri·o

(vib'rē-ō),
A member of the genus Vibrio.

Vibrio

/Vib·rio/ (vib´re-o) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Spirillaceae). V. cho´lerae (V. com´ma), or cholera vibrio, is the cause of Asiatic cholera; V. metschniko´vii causes gastroenteritis; V. parahaemoly´ticus causes gastroenteritis due to consumption of raw or undercooked seafood; and V. vulni´ficus causes septicemia and cellulitis in persons who have consumed raw seafood.

vibrio

/vib·rio/ (vib´re-o) pl. vibrio´nes, vibrios   an organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism.
cholera vibrio  Vibrio cholerae ; see Vibrio .
El Tor vibrio  a biotype of Vibrio cholerae ; see Vibrio .

vibrio

(vĭb′rē-ō′)
n. pl. vibri·os
Any of various short, motile, S-shaped or comma-shaped bacteria of the genus Vibrio, especially V. cholerae, which causes cholera.

vib′ri·oid′ (-oid′) adj.

vibrio

[vib′rē·ō]
Etymology: L, vibrare
any bacterium that is curved and motile, such as those belonging to the genus Vibrio. Cholera and several other epidemic forms of gastroenteritis are caused by members of the genus.

Vib·ri·o

(vib'rē-ō)
A genus of motile (in some instances nonmotile), non-spore-forming, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria containing short curved or straight rods that occur singly or are occasionally united into S shapes or spirals. Some of these organisms are saprophytes in water and soil; others are parasites or pathogens. The type species is V. cholerae.
[L. vibro, to vibrate]

vib·ri·o

(vib'rē-ō)
A member of the genus Vibrio.

Vibrio

A genus of curved, motile, GRAM NEGATIVE organisms that contains the bacillus, Vibrio cholerae that causes CHOLERA.

vibrio

a curved or comma-shaped BACTERIUM. A genus of Gram-negative bacteria (see GRAM'S STAIN that are FACULTATIVE anaerobes and include some important PATHOGENS, such as Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of CHOLERA.

Vibrio

genus of Gram-negative bacteria
  • Vibrio cholerae causes cholera

  • Vibrio vulnificus causes tropical sea-borne infection with painful erythema, purpura, oedema and necrosis of one/both feet, secondary to direct inoculation or ingesting V. vulnificus -infected seafood

Vibrio

a genus of gram-negative, short, motile, curved or straight rods in the family Vibrionaceae of bacteria. Microaerophilic species are now classified as Campylobacter spp.

Vibrio anguillarum
causes disease in freshwater and marine fish and eels.
Vibrio coli, Vibrio fetus
Vibrio meleagridis
isolated from sinuses of turkeys with sinusitis. Not a recognized bacterial species.
Vibrio metchnikovii
found in the intestine of humans and birds; causes a cholera-like enteritis.
Vibrio parahaemolyticus
found in sea foods; causes enteritis in humans.

vibrio

an organism of the genus Vibrio, or other spiral motile organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genomic science in understanding cholera outbreaks and evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen.
Total viable bacterial and vibrio counts from moribund scallop were 1.
Meanwhile, it has been only six years since states were required to federally report Vibrio illnesses.
Epidemiology, genetics, and ecology of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.
Vibrio proliferation has been controlled by prophylaxis and chemical products in commercial shrimp farms (GATESOUPE et al.
In previous research he found that Vibrio became the dominant type of marine bacteria off the south-eastern US as oil tanker traffic increased after the 1970s.
CDC estimates that as many as 4,500 cases of Vibrio parahaemolyticus occur every year, of which an average of 215 culture-confirmed cases, 30 hospitalizations, and one to two deaths are reported (CDC, 2008b).
All three vibrio bugs were discovered in Norwegian mussels and seawater by Anette Bauer Ellingsen of the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science.
Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative, highly motile, curved or comma-shaped rod bacterium that produces cholera enterotoxin and responsible for the life-threatening secretory diarrhoea.
METHODS: We examined the geographic diffusion of three cholera outbreaks through their linkage with the wind direction: a) the progress of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in Africa during 1970-1971 and b) again in 2005-2006; and c) the rapid spread of Vibrio cholerae O139 over India during 1992-1993.
The patient's stool culture grew only Vibrio fluvialis on TCBS agar, and his diarrhea and profound acidosis completely resolved within 24 hours of initiating antibiotics.
The FDA allows Vibrio vulnificus bacteria in Gulf Coast shellfish to kill about 20 people each year, permits the sale of fish that are highly contaminated with mercury, and fails to restrict cancer-causing acrylamide contaminants in foods.