vestibule

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vestibule

 [ves´tĭ-būl]
a space or cavity at the entrance to another structure. adj., adj vestib´ular.
vestibule of aorta a small space within the left ventricle at the root of the aorta.
vestibule of ear an oval cavity in the middle of the bony labyrinth.
vestibule of mouth the portion of the oral cavity bounded on one side by teeth and gingivae (or the residual alveolar ridges) and on the other by the lips (labial vestibule) and cheeks (buccal vestibule).
nasal vestibule (vestibule of nose) the anterior part of the nasal cavity; it is lined with stratified squamous epithelium and contains hairs (vibrissae) and sebaceous glands.
vestibule of vagina the space between the labia minora into which the urethra and vagina open.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ves·ti·bule

(ves'ti-byūl), [TA]
1. A small cavity or a space at the entrance of a canal.
2. Specifically, the central, somewhat ovoid, cavity of the osseous labyrinth communicating with the semicircular canals posteriorly and the cochlea anteriorly.
Synonym(s): vestibulum [TA]
[L. vestibulum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vestibule

(vĕs′tə-byo͞ol′)
n.
1. A small entrance hall or passage between the outer door and the interior of a house or building.
2. An enclosed area at the end of a passenger car on a railroad train.
3. Anatomy A body cavity, chamber, or channel that leads to or is an entrance to another body cavity: the vestibule of the inner ear.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ves·ti·bule

(ves'ti-byūl) [TA]
1. A small cavity or a space at the entrance of a canal.
2. Specifically, the central, somewhat ovoid, cavity of the osseous labyrinth communicating with the semicircular canals posteriorly and the cochlea anteriorly.
Synonym(s): vestibulum.
[L. vestibulum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vestibule

A space or cavity forming the entrance to another cavity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

vestibule

any passageway from one cavity to another, such as the depression leading to the mouth in Paramecium or from the VULVA to VAGINA in the female mammal.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Vestibule

Vestibule of vulva; vestibule of vagina; the space between the labia minor containing the openings of the vagina and urethra.
Mentioned in: Vulvodynia
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ves·ti·bule

(ves'ti-byūl) [TA]
1. Small cavity or a space at entrance of a canal.
2. Specifically, central, somewhat ovoid, cavity of osseous labyrinth communicating with semicircular canals posteriorly and cochlea anteriorly.
[L. vestibulum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In another study, Wang (2013) was able to model the 15 m/s (49.29 ft/s) supply air-curtain door in the airflow simulation software CONTAM (Dols and Polidoro 2016) to calculate the infiltration reductions when compared to a vestibule door in the U.S.
The airflow models from Yuill's (1996) study are used for the single and vestibule doors, and the infiltration characteristics obtained by Qi et al.
Single and vestibule doors are modeled using the power-law model Q = C[([DELTA]P).sup.n] with a power of 0.5 (n = 0.5), and the flow coefficients C from the model proposed by Yuill (1996) for 2 X 2.4 m (6.56 X 7.87 ft) (W X H) doors based on hourly door usage frequency for each building.
The energy savings obtained by air-curtain and vestibule doors in the two buildings were acquired using Equation 5 and Equation 6:
[E.sub.base] = annual site end-use energy of the model with the single or vestibule doors
[E.sub.vest] = annual side end-use energy of the model simulated with a vestibule door
Both the vestibule and air-curtain doors are compared to the single-door case to assess their NWA savings for the two buildings in accordance to the weights proposed by PNNL (Jarnagin and Bandyopadhyay 2010).
The building's energy consumption with air-curtain doors is also compared to that of the vestibule doors for the +30% and -30% cases.
A 3M bullet-resistant film also will be installed on all glass vestibule doors and windows.
Charles East High School, it would mean constructing a new vestibule wall and installing a window to the office where visitors can show their IDs and sign in, or drop off students' belongings.