Verticillium

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Verticillium

(ver'ti-sil'ē-ŭm),
A genus of hyphomycetous fungi often found in clinical specimens as contaminants. They are occasionally found in the meatus in cases of otitis externa, but are of doubtful pathogenicity.
[L. verticillus, the whirl of a spindle]

Verticillium

a genus of fungi which are normally plant, insect, nematode or arachnid pathogens. Opportunistic infection in mammals have been reported.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our obtained results for iron chelate were unexpected since Goldweber [14] recommended the use of a chelated iron in groves planted on old tomato land appears to have promise as a management practice for the prevention of severe Verticillium wilt infections in avocado and mango trees.
Impact of animal manures on Verticillium wilt, potato scab and soil microbial populations.
Resistant, Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1, 2 and 3), root-knot nematode, gray leaf spot and Tomato spotted wilt.
The diseases most effectively controlled by crop rotation are root pathogens such as fusarium and verticillium wilt.
Solar Fire is resistant to races 1, 2, and 3 of Fusarium wilt as well as Verticillium wilt race 1 and gray leafspot.
The breeders are working miracles and already have tomatoes like Ferline, which is new for 2004 and is at least resistant to fusarium and verticillium wilt.
Many common weeds (lambs quarters, pigweed) and vegetables (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant) harbor verticillium wilt, according to author Dorothy Hinshaw Patent.
The 1990 harvests varied, with yields ranging from slightly less than a bale to about a bale and a half (one bale is 480 pounds of lint) per acre, depending on whether a particular growing area had favorable weather conditions throughout the season or was affected by verticillium wilt that was reactivated by a cold snap in July.
Previous research by other scientistshas shown that inoculating cotton seedlings with the fungus causing verticillium wilt protected against later fungal attacks.
Verticillium dahliae, a soilborne fungus that causes Verticillium wilt, first appeared in lettuce in 1995 in Watsonville.
Proper equipment sanitization especially removal of large clumps of soil from farm machinery, vehicles and tools is a key factor for preventing the spread of soil-borne insects like wheat midge, weed seeds, pathogens, and diseases like clubroot, verticillium wilt and soybean cyst nematode that can be carried in soil and spread to other fields.