vernalization

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Related to Vernalisation: phytochrome

vernalization

a process in which young plants are treated with low temperatures (2–5 °C) to induce a change to an older physiological state, thus shortening the interval between sowing and flowering. Vernalization can be reversed by high temperatures.
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Advances in plant breeding to eliminate the need for vernalisation have led to new varieties of pansy, wallflowers, stocks and forget-menots that flower in autumn and winter as well as spring.
It also shorten the growth period duration of wheat crop and this becomes more severe regarding yield losses if it occurs during the canopy formation because less time will be available for vernalisation process and the formation of kernels.
He said that the plants retain a "molecular memory" of the prolonged cold of winter, which is reset in each new generation to ensure it is able to respond to vernalisation.
Research on identification of wheat lines possessing different vernalisation genes by PAGE method.
There will be issues for crops that require vernalisation due to the milder winters and plants may not become acclimatised to be able to withstand radiation frosts.
Genetic control of cold hardiness and vernalisation requirement in winter wheat.
The crop parameters kl and xf for maize, peanut, and soybean, and vernalisation sensitivity and photoperiod sensitivity for wheat were varied until observed time of anthesis, rate of water extraction, leaf area index, and yield were adequately represented.
The new plant has been carefully bred not to need the cold - a process previously known in the botanical world as vernalisation. Hence no-verna.
Experiments have shown that the Swedish ecotypes won't flower until exposed to low winter temperatures: a phenomenon called vernalisation. And they delay flowering until daylength exceeds some critical minimum.
It undergoes a process known as vernalisation, initiated by frost and low temperatures, which starts the division of the developing bulb into separate cloves.
But more significantly, Lysenko convinced Stalin that with appropriate techniques (including vernalisation) the laws governing inheritance could be altered.