vernacular

(redirected from Vernacular languages)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
* de-vernacularisation--converting a standard language into a classical language, or a vernacular language into a dead one.
The introduction presents the linguistic background of Saint Lucia and explores how vernacular languages have fared within other nations, specifically in the context of education.
The prefatory material admits that much has been published on the relationships between Latin and the vernacular languages in the intervening period, and this volume seems to be occupying a curious place in the discourse, inviting readers to consider 'whether the assumptions and conclusions of the contributions ...
Eschewing emotive judgments on the quality of Jewish versions of vernacular languages which have bedevilled the historiography of Yiddish, Fudeman avoids terms like Judeo-French.
Through fifteen linked stories, Bangalore Calling explores the social costs of outsourcing to the Indian community - the erosion of cultures, the displacement of vernacular languages and accents, demystifying the shadows of Bangalore's BPO phenomenon.
It made its way through Hebrew, Latin and then into vernacular languages up to the present.
The book is a well-argued case of "creolizationas-versatility," is provocative, and will certainly inspire other scholars to explore further sources in vernacular languages in their respective fields of study.
Three chapters in this volume advocate for more inclusion of vernacular languages, as only about 6% of the population uses Tetum as a first language.
Ocean of Letters provides a fascinating historical account of the Malagasy people from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century, focusing on how their vernacular languages survived in a context of slavery or forced dispersion, colonization by successive European powers, and Christian mission.
In 2001 the Holy See published Liturgiam authenticum (LA) (on the use of vernacular languages in the publication of the books of the Roman Liturgy).
Significantly, in the British imperial phase, the literature of these officially ignored vernacular languages like Bengali, Tamil, and Urdu flourished as vehicles of resistance against British rule.
As is usually the case with most of our work, we seem blissfully ignorant of the considerable literature on the subject in the vernacular languages. For instance, while Abanindranath Tagore's English essay of 1968 is cited, there is no mention of his Bengali writings nor of his famous uncle Rabindranath Tagore who had a great deal to say about theories of art and aesthetics.