vernacular

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Related to Vernacular language: Vernacular architecture, Standard language

vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Ferguson (1959), the distinction between high and low domains forms the basis for the language-political phenomenon of diglossia, where all members of a speech community are socially conditioned bilinguals, having both a vernacular language for low domains, and a distinct standard language for high domains.
Considering the situation of Burushaski, the case study looked at the possibilities to use and choose vernacular language Burushaski for education.
The book is a well-argued case of "creolizationas-versatility," is provocative, and will certainly inspire other scholars to explore further sources in vernacular languages in their respective fields of study.
Sonia Sanchez's poems entwine righteous political rage and deep compassion, casting complex ideas and emotions into stark, vivid vernacular language in lines such as "under a soprano sky, a woman sings,/lovely as chandeliers." To say Sanchez is an important poet is an understatement.
The words, Cumann Luthchleas Gael remain, etched within the cross to record the contribution made to the preservation of Irish, the oldest written vernacular language in Europe.
"When I first spoke to the producers, they were afraid no one would understand the 'ch'ti' (the vernacular language of the movie)." But Boon explains the film's success lies in its singularity.
Many revisit established strategies for the translation of vernacular language, including standardization, substitution of a source-language variety with a target-language one, or the creation of an ad hoc variant to signal distance from the standard.
Written especially for adolescents and teenagers, Alexander The Great Rocks The World chronicles the events of Alexander's life, his military conquests, his ideals of unity, his battle tactics, and much more in detailed yet plain-spoken vernacular language. Black-and-white representations of classic artworks and illustrations add a visual touch to this fascinating, easy-to-follow accounting of how Alexander the Great literally changed world history.
(2.) The term demotic is a derivative of the word demos, which means "populace," and reveals the unmistakable connection of these songs with the vernacular language as well as the secular musical tradition.
Ffiona Swabey's Eleanor Of Aquitaine, Courtly Love, And The Troubadours (0313325235, $45.00) tells of the 12th century troubadours who wrote new romances in vernacular language to express and present the image of the feminine.
A poet whose performance requires familiarity with contemporary vernacular language? A poet who thinks "academic poetry" is boring?
An immediate practical objection is that there is hardly a "standard Latin pronunciation." Throughout history, Latin pronunciation has developed in accordance to the vernacular language of its users.