Venus flytrap

(redirected from Venus flytraps)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

Venus flytrap

Dionaea muscipula, a carnivorous plant in which a hinged leaf snaps shut on insects from which the plant obtains nitrogenous compounds.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Venus flytraps absorb nutrients from insects and spiders that get caught in their leaves.
The few ecological studies that have been carried out indicate that, although Venus flytrap is highly adapted to its habitat (maximum nitrogen acquisition can be 92% from insects [16]), they are still outcompeted by other plants over time [17].
To catch a meal that can fly away in the blink of an eye, a Venus flytrap has to be speedy.
He has all the responsibilities of a police officer, but his main duty is to protect the wildlife, hunting and natural resources of the state, including its Venus flytraps.
Researchers in Germany learned that the Venus flytrap adjusts its feeding behaviour according to the number of times the hairs are stimulated.
* Venus flytraps prevent false alarms (unnecessary closing) by requiring two separate stimulations of their trigger hairs within 30 seconds to set off the trap.
A 15 acre oasis in the heart of Edgbaston, you can stroll the grounds as well as visit the Tropical House, see the Venus flytraps and sundews in the Subtropical House, look at the cacti and spurges in the Arid House and the fuchsias, coleus and shrubs in the tranquil Mediterranean House.
That's because Venus flytraps are carnivorous (meat eating) and snack on organisms like flies, grasshoppers, or even large lizards that venture too close.
Designs inspired by orchids, venus flytraps and overgrown jungles brought the rainforest to the catwalk.
BALTIMORE: Instead of heroin or cocaine, the search of a suitcase at Baltimore-Washington International Airport turned up thousands of tiny Venus flytraps - a carnivorous plant in vogue in Europe and Asia.
After tentatively putting my fingers in a carnivorous plant at this year's Gardeners World show, I was warned to read a tale by a rather disturbed individual who just had to ask the question, "Can Venus flytraps digest human flesh?" This fruit cake had contracted a really nasty case of athlete's foot, that at its worst saw flakes ("yea, even chunks," he recalls) peeling off the soles of his feet.