venom

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Related to Venoms: Snake venoms

venom

 [ven´om]
poison, especially a toxic substance normally secreted by a serpent, insect, or other animal.
Russell's viper venom the venom of Vipera russelli (Russell's viper), which acts in vitro as an intrinsic thromboplastin and is useful in defining deficiencies of coagulation factor X.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm),
A poisonous fluid secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, etc.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

(vĕn′əm)
n.
A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.

venom

Toxicology A poisonous substance produced by an insect or animal, stored in specific sacs and sundry sites, and released by biting or stinging; venoms, the original biological weapons, are used for defense and to capture prey. See Snake venom, Yellow jacket venom.

ven·om

(ven'ŏm)
A toxin secreted by snakes, spiders, scorpions, and other cold-blooded animals.
[M. Eng. and O. Fr. venim, fr. L. venenum, poison]

venom

Poison produced by scorpions, some jellyfish, some fish, a few snakes, some toads, the Gila monster, some spiders and a few insects such as bees, wasps or hornets. Venoms act in various ways and may affect either the nervous system, to cause paralysis, or the blood to cause either widespread clotting or bleeding. Venoms are seldom fatal except in very young or debilitated people.

Venom

A poisonous substance secreted by an animal, usually delivered through a bite or a sting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Snake venom is said to have the highest toxicity potential which makes it an option in the development of anti-cancer agents.
Keywords: inflammation, peptides, venom, scorpions, Androctonus finitimus, cytokines.
The approach used in the study may also help researchers predict the potency of venoms in species that have yet to be tested, and even pinpoint potentially useful healthcare-related applications.
"When I was presented with the opportunity to play Venom - and that correlated with my son's love of Venom and how cool he was - I got really, really excited and decided I wanted to do it," Hardy explained.
Now venom specialists at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine have shown it is possible to treat the bite from one snake with antivenom produced from a completely different species.
A complex mixture of biologically active molecules composes this venom, ranging from low molecular mass compounds to peptides and allergenic proteins [9, 10].
Cohen, "Hemorrhagic and blood coagulation disturbing action of snake venoms," Recent Advances in Blood Coagulation, 1969.
Analysis of the contributions of metalloproteases, common components of Bothrops venoms, showed that the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline partially or completely prevented the effects of the venom on the generation of anaphylatoxins and TCC in whole serum (Figure 2), suggesting an important role for metalloproteases in the activation of the Complement system.
Fire ant venoms: intraspecific and interspecific variation among castes and individuals.
This was followed by the injection of venom (1.0 mg/kg) in the peripheral segment of the same femoral artery, and the cardiorespiratory parameters were recorded at every 5 min up to 60 min.
It is important to distinguish between the snakes with the most potent venom and those which pose the greatest threat to humans.