cannula

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cannula

 [kan´u-lah]
a tube for insertion into a vessel, duct, or cavity. During insertion its lumen is usually occupied by a trocar; following placement, the trocar is removed and the cannula remains patent as a channel for the flow of fluids.
nasal cannula one that fits into the nostrils for delivery of oxygen therapy. Called also nasal prongs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă),
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid or passage of instruments.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cannula

also

canula

(kăn′yə-lə)
n. pl. cannu·las or cannu·lae (-lē′)
A flexible tube, usually containing a trocar at one end, that is inserted into a bodily cavity, duct, or vessel to drain fluid or administer a substance such as a medication.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cannula

A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; its lumen is maintained closed by a trocar during insertion.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cannula

Surgery A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; during insertion, its lumen is occluded by a trocar. See Endoscopy, Nasal cannula, QuickDrawvenous cannula, Trocar.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity or vein, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid. Intravenous cannulas should be changed regularly to prevent thrombophlebitis.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cannula

(kan'u-la) [L., a small reed]
Enlarge picture
NEEDLELESS CANNULAE USED TO CONNECT AN ADDITIVE TO PRIMARY INTRAVENOUS INFUSIONS
A tube or sheath that encloses a trocar. After the device is inserted into a blood vessel, body cavity, duct, or hollow organ, withdrawal of the trocar lets fluid drain (so that it can be collected or sampled) or escape. See: illustration

Bellocq's cannula

See: Bellocq's cannula
Enlarge picture
NASAL CANNULA FOR OXYGEN DELIVERY.

nasal cannula

Tubing used to deliver oxygen at levels from 1 to 6 L/min. The nasal prongs of the cannula extend approx. 1 cm into each naris and are connected to a common tube, which is then connected to the oxygen source. It is used to treat conditions in which a slightly enriched oxygen content is needed, such as emphysema. The exact percentage of oxygen delivered to the patient varies with respiratory rate and other factors.
illustrationillustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

cannula

A hollow surgical tube, into which is inserted a close fitting, sharp-pointed inner stiffener called a trocar. The combination can easily be pushed through the skin or the lining of a blood vessel or other tissue. When in position, the trocar is pulled backwards out of the cannula, leaving the latter in place. Fluids or other materials may then be passed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cannula

A tube inserted into a cavity to serve as a channel for the transport of fluid.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
Tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The new probe was constructed in such a way that it could be inserted through an indwelling Venflon catheter, and the shaft length was such that the microdialysis membrane protruded just out of the tip of the Venflon catheter.
The probe was introduced into a Venflon catheter already inserted into the vein.
Peripheral venous blood was collected through an indwelling forearm catheter (Venflon [R]) before thrombolytic therapy was started in the coronary care unit (time 0), then serially on day 1 (e.g., 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h after initiating therapy), and then daily until day 7 after admission.