shortening

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shortening

1. Loss of bone length after a fracture, as a result of malunion or pronounced bony angulation.
2. A decrease in the length of a contracting muscle fiber.
References in periodicals archive ?
DOUBLE CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES 3/4 cup butter-flavored vegetable shortening 1 1/4 cups firmly packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons milk 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 egg 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts 3/4 cup milk chocolate chips 3/4 cup white chocolate chips 1.
Documentation acceptable to the Department, from the manufacturers of such food products, indicating whether the food products contain vegetable shortening, margarine or any kind of partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, or indicating trans fat content, may be maintained instead of original labels.
Here is how we determine the percentage of vegetable shortening:
baking powder 450 g butter or vegetable shortening 400 g brown sugar (you can also use white sugar) 2 eggs 1/2 tsp.
For example, corn oil can be changed into a solid vegetable shortening.
"Shortening," "vegetable shortening," and "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil" all mean the food contains trans fats.
Coat your cooking dishes with vegetable or butter-flavor cooking spray rather than using vegetable shortening or butter.
They contain both partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening and high-fructose corn syrup, ingredients that are becoming perpetually less accepted among conscientious shoppers.
Students construct a blubber glove using a pair of zip-lock bags and solid vegetable shortening. An empty glove is constructed as a control.
If you only make one dietary change, stop using all products that contain hydrogenated oil, partially hydrogenated oil, or vegetable shortening. They block normal biochemistry and have been linked to cancer, arthritis, eczema, irritable bowel syndrome and other inflammatory diseases.
Saturated rats such as margarine and vegetable shortening are commercially produced by the partial or complete saturation of oils--this transformation is chemically induced and is accompanied by solidification of its normal liquid state.
Researchers also added different amounts of ascorbic acid, salt, sugar, milk, water, and vegetable shortening, along with active dry yeast.