Vectors


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Vectors

Something used to transport genetic information to a cell.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
The survey population also reported that they checked their homes for mosquito breeding after having been fined under the Destruction of Disease-Bearing Insects Act, which has been superseded by the 1998 Control of Vectors and Pesticide Act.
For 2 decades, away from the noise of the latest ups and downs for viral vectors, chemists and materials scientists have been doggedly investigating and improving on other strategies such as using capsules that protect and guide DNA into cells and methods of introducing naked DNA.
A growing body of data shows that the use of AAV1 pseudotyped vectors improves the efficiency of delivery of recombinant AAV vectors to various tissues including muscle and brain.
It is often associated with camping out in rural locations in close proximity to animal reservoirs of the spirochete and their associated Ornithodoros tick vectors (Figure 1) (7-9).
Successful gene therapy, many investigators contend, will depend on finding vectors that insert therapeutic genes into a cell's chromosomes.
E[acute accent]This release contains forward-looking statements regarding our intellectual property, research programs and clinical trials, our product development and our potential development platforms including AAV vectors and other statements about our plans, objectives, intentions and expectations and other statements about our plans, objectives, intentions and expectations.
Remotely sensed surrogates of meteorological data for the study of the distribution and abundance of arthropod vectors of disease.
This patent covers numerous growth conditions that support the release of AAV vectors into the media.
This book begins by discussing the vectors themselves, with chapters on mites, ticks, true bugs, lice, fleas, mosquitoes, and various dipterans such as tsetse flies and sand flies.
To the Editor: We define reservoir competence of a host for a vector-borne pathogen in terms of three component questions: How susceptible is the putative reservoir host when the pathogen is delivered by the bite of an infected vector tick?
The disruptive effect of war on agriculture and water [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] can increase vector breeding sites; the destruction of housing can increase human contact; the destruction of cattle can prompt zoophilic vectors to become [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] if their usual food supply is disrupted (27); and control measures can be [ILLEGIBLE TEXT] diminished if health-care facilities are reduced or unavailable.
Both vectors have produced potent immune responses in a number of models and have been demonstrated to be safe in humans.