peptide

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Related to Vasoactive intestinal peptide: Gastric inhibitory peptide

peptide

 [pep´tīd]
any member of a class of compounds of low molecular weight that yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis. They are the constituent parts of proteins and are formed by loss of water from the NH2 and COOH groups of adjacent amino acids. Peptides are known as dipeptides, tripeptides, tetrapeptides, and so on depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. See also polypeptide.
vasoactive intestinal peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd),
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; that is, a substituted amide.
See also: polypeptide. Compare: eupeptide bond, isopeptide bond.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

peptide

(pĕp′tīd′)
n.
Any of various natural or synthetic compounds containing two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds that link the carboxyl group of one amino acid to the amino group of another.

pep·tid′ic (-tĭd′ĭk) adj.
pep·tid′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

peptide

A biomolecule consisting of two or more amino acids joined by a peptide bond, which combine to make proteins.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; i.e., a substituted amide.
Compare: bioregulator
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

peptide

A chain of two or more AMINO ACIDS linked by peptide bonds between the amino and carboxyl groups of adjacent acids. Large peptides, containing many amino acids, are called polypeptides. Chains of linked polypeptides, are called PROTEINS. Peptides occur widely in the body. Many HORMONES are peptides.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

peptide

any of a group of compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked by chemical bonding. See PEPTIDE BOND, DIPEPTIDE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
Compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Torroba et al., "Vasoactive intestinal peptide modulates proinflammatory mediator synthesis in osteoarthritic and rheumatoid synovial cells," Rheumatology, vol.
Delgado, "Vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide inhibit CBP-NF-[kappa]B interaction in activated microglia," Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol.
Active immunization with vasoactive intestinal peptide prevents the secretion of prolactin induced by electrical stimulation of the turkey hypothalamus.
Rosenzweig, "Characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors in retina," Experimental Eye Research, vol.
Ganea, "Vasoactive intestinal peptide: a neuropeptide with pleiotropic immune functions," Amino Acids, vol.
"This suggests that the mutations increase signaling in the Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide pathway," says Professor Corvin.
The mutations were in the gene for VIPR2, the receptor for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) -- a chemical messenger known to play a role in brain development.
Serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonists attenuate rotavirus diarrhea.
Vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) couples heterotrimeric G proteins, Gas and G[alpha]i, that activate and inhibit adenylate cyclase cAMP production.
Glucagon, GIP, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors als o belong to this receptor superfamily.
Effects of EO on motilin (MTL), gastrin (GAS), somatostatin (SS) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) levels in rats that underwent restraint stress

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