varicocele

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varicocele

 [var´ĭ-ko-sēl″]
varicosity of the pampiniform plexus of the spermatic cord, forming a scrotal swelling that feels like a “bag of worms.”

var·i·co·cele

(var'i-kō-sēl'),
A condition manifested by abnormal dilation of the veins of the spermatic cord, caused by incompetent valves in the internal spermatic vein and resulting in impaired drainage of blood into the spermatic cord veins when the person assumes an upright position.
Synonym(s): pampinocele
[varico- + G. kēlē, tumor, hernia]

varicocele

(văr′ĭ-kō-sēl′)
n.
A varicose condition of veins of the spermatic cord or the ovaries, forming a soft tumor.

varicocele

Varicose veins in scrotum Urology Elongated and dilated veins of the pampiniform plexus–the network of veins leaving the testis which join to form the testicular vein; varicoceles appear bluish through the scrotum and impart a bag of worms-like sensation to palpation Clinical Varicoceles are caused by incompetent valves in spermatic cord veins; abnormal valves obstruct normal blood flow causing a backup of blood, resulting in venous dilation; varicoceles usually develop slowly and may be asymptomatic; incidence is higher in ♂ age 15 and 25; varicoceles are linked to infertility in 40% of ♂ treated for infertility; abrupt appearance of a varicocele in older ♂ may be caused by a renal tumor affecting the renal vein and altering the blood flow through the spermatic vein

var·i·co·cele

(var'i-kō-sēl)
A condition manifested by abnormal dilation of the veins of the spermatic cord, caused by incompetent valves in the internal spermatic vein, and resulting in impaired drainage of blood into the spermatic cord veins when the patient assumes the upright position.
[varico- + G. kēlē, tumor, hernia]

varicocele

VARICES in the plexus of veins that surrounds the testicle, usually on the left side, forming an irregular swelling in the scrotum. This is usually of no significance but may cause a dragging ache and may affect fertility. In these cases surgical correction is needed.

Varicocele

An abnormal enlargement of the veins which drain the testicles.
Mentioned in: Scrotal Ultrasound

Patient discussion about varicocele

Q. Should I do surgery for varicoceles? I went to an urologist and he recommended surgery, but I don’t know if I should do this…is it dangerous? Can I live with the varicocele?

A. I don’t see your problem, you said an urologist advised you to do so- that should be enough no? if you don’t trust him, go and get a second opinion. The surgery is not that bad, an hour later and you are walking out. Vary small risk of complication. I did it and it was fine.

More discussions about varicocele
References in periodicals archive ?
A varicocele (VAR-ih-koe-seel) is an enlargement of the veins in the scrotum.
Comparison of gonadal function between fertile and infertile men with varicoceles. Fertil Steril 1986;46:930-3.
The procedure is called Varicocele Embolization, which can be performed in an outpatient setting, and a person can return to his normal activities in 24 hours.
Our group has demonstrated, for the first time, NO over-production within dilated spermatic veins in adolescent affected by varicocele [29].
Zinc, D-aspartate, and coenzyme Q10 may be useful as antioxidant therapy for male infertility patients without varicoceles, and a previous study showed that they exerted a direct protective effect on human spermatozoa, preventing the decrease in motility and the increase in DNA fragmentation measured by the TUNEL assay during in vitro culture [52].
Varicoceles are a common finding, with a reported prevalence of 15% in the general population (67).
Subclinical varicocele is a condition in which varicose veins from the pampiniform plexus cannot be diagnosed by physical examination but need adjunctive diagnostic methods such as Doppler examination, color Doppler ultrasound, scrotal thermography, or venography [1].
* Varicoceles from both sides of the body can be corrected at the same time without the need for further surgical incisions.
Varicocele can be described as an abnormal vascular dilation of the pampiniform plexus, which is the most identifiable common cause of male infertility [19].
At interventional radiology, a scrotal ultrasound found bilateral varicoceles, a small left testicle, and two-minute cystic structures within the left testicle, which per report, could be cystic dysplasia or early epidermoid cysts.
Material and methods: Forty-five patients with a mean age of 30.4 years, who had been diagnosed with varicoceles by physical examination and 30 healthy males with a mean age of 28.3 years and without any signs of varicoceles were included in this study.