esophageal varices

(redirected from Variceal bleed)

varix

 [vār´iks] (L.)
an enlarged, tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
aneurysmal varix a markedly dilated tortuous vessel; sometimes used to denote a form of arteriovenous aneurysm in which the blood flows directly into a neighboring vein without the intervention of a connecting sac.
arterial varix a racemose aneurysm or varicose artery.
esophageal varices varicosities of branches of the azygous vein which anastomose with tributaries of the portal vein in the lower esophagus; due to portal hypertension in cirrhosis of the liver.
lymph varix (varix lympha´ticus) a soft, lobulated swelling of a lymph node due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels.

e·soph·a·ge·al var·i·ces

longitudinal venous varices at the lower end of the esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; they are superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.

esophageal varices

The presence of varices under the esophageal mucosa, which most commonly occurs in a background of advanced liver disease Etiology Portal HTN, schistosomiasis Management Acute hemorrhage of EVs is treated by balloon compression; rebleeding is common, and is preemptively managed with endoscopic sclerotherapy, which in turn is often complicated by rebleeding, stenosis, & esophageal ulceration; some data suggest that combined modality therapy with a β-blocking agent–nadolol, propranolol and an anti-hypertensive–isosorbide mononitrate is better than endoscopic sclerotherapy in treating EVs Prognosis Good if unrelated to cirrhosis. See Endoscopic sclerotherapy, Nadolol with isosorbide mononitrate.

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at the lower end of the esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; they are superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
Synonym(s): oesophageal varices.

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at lower end of esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2012) The effectiveness of current acute variceal bleed treatments in unselected cirrhotic patients: refining short-term prognosis and risk factors.
A 57 year old gentleman with history of Child's C liver cirrhosis complicated by oesophageal varices and prior variceal bleed, alcohol dependence and multiple cardiovascular risk factors presented to our Emergency Department with abdominal pain and distension.
Findings were that of grade 1 oesophageal varices with no features of variceal bleed. There was a large clot in the fundus and cardia of the stomach.
Muzaffar Latif Gul delivered lecture on Acute Variceal Bleed and said that if the disease is being diagnosed at the early stages then there would be chances of recovery increases.
Currently, combined therapies, such as NSBBs and ISMN or prazosin, are used in prevention of first variceal bleed and rebleeding (Bosch et al., 2008).
It is well known that TIPS formation increases the likelihood and severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and it is estimated that 30% of patients who receive TIPS for stomal variceal bleed will develop hepatic encephalopathy [9].
Other causes included pneumonia 40 (6.5%), intracranial bleed 23 (3.7%), coronary artery thrombosis 20 (3.2%), cardiac tamponade 19 (3.1%), pulmonary tuberculosis, subarachnoid bleed, alcoholic liver disease, peritonitis, lung abscess, oesophageal variceal bleed, rupture of aortic aneurysm, myocarditis, etc.
At the age of 5 years he had had an oesphageal variceal bleed secondary to an extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis following umbilical vein sepsis caused by a venous catheter used during a neonatal illness.
About 50% of patients with a variceal bleed stop bleeding spontaneously.
He then referred to the possible time for prevention of variceal bleed. Now there is no indication to use beta blockers to prevent varices.
Of the 179 patients, 12 (7%) had a significant variceal bleed, and only 50% of these patients had received a screening endoscopy within 6 months of their index date.
Constipation was the most common precipitating factor for encephalopathy occurring in 231(78.1%) patients, followed by esophageal variceal bleed and infection in 47(14.8%) and 38(12.1%) patients respectively.