evaporation

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e·vap·o·ra·tion

(ē-vap'ŏ-ra'shŭn),
1. A change from liquid to vapor form.
2. Loss of volume of a liquid by conversion into vapor.
Synonym(s): volatilization
[L. e, out, + vaporo, to emit vapor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

e·vap·o·ra·tion

(ē-vap'ŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. A change from liquid to vapor.
2. Loss of volume of a liquid by conversion into vapor.
Synonym(s): volatilization.
[L. e, out, + vaporo, to emit vapor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

evaporation

the physical change when a liquid becomes a gas. Since such a change usually requires heat as an energy source, heat is drawn from the immediate environment, which produces a significant cooling effect. The size of the cooling effect depends on the latent heat of evaporation of the liquid. Evaporation of water is used by mammals in temperature regulation through sweating, and occurs in plants from the surface of the mesophyll cells during TRANSPIRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at Istanbul Hisar International Hosptial and comprised 63 male patients who were on anti-coagulant therapy for comorbidities and who underwent prostate vapourisation for benign prostate hyperplasia with 120 Watts potassium titanyl phosphate from November 2007 to December 2010.
The vapourisation of the water within the mineral substrate causes the surrounding material to literally explode away [Eversole et al., 1997].
The second and third tanks rinse the product at temperatures up to 70[degrees]C, allowing the product to dry rapidly by vapourisation. Each tank incorporates a lip extract system which effectively prevents water vapour from invading the surrounding atmosphere or adjoining tanks.
* Vapourisation: These losses result from the equilibrium vapour pressure of the amine in the solution varying with operating conditions.
They focus a large amount of energy on a small space and produce ablation, incision, carbonisation, vapourisation and coagulation of the tissue.
For the complete vapourisation of all liquids the cutting stream is heated to the minimum temperatures required.