valsalva manoeuvre

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valsalva manoeuvre

The effort to breathe out forcibly while the mouth and nose are firmly closed or the vocal cords pressed together. The valsalva manoeuvre is employed while straining at stool and in other circumstances. It causes a rise in blood pressure followed by a sharp drop and then a second sharp rise in blood pressure. This may be dangerous in people with heart disease and should be avoided. (Antonio Maria Valsalva, 1666–1723, Italian anatomist).
References in periodicals archive ?
PV obliquely perforates the deep muscular fascia and associates the with the superficial vein (a), diameter of PV measured at the suprafascial-subfascial connection level (b), augmentation of blood flow by compression of the limb below PV and Valsalva's maneuver are used to assess valvular integrity with color flow imaging (c), and spectral Doppler imaging (d)
Valsalva's maneuver occurs during exercise or activities that require strong pressure from the muscles of the upper torso.
A comparison of the cuff deflation method with Valsalva's maneuver and limb compression in detecting venous valvular reflux.
We report a case of this complication in a young man who forcefully performed Valsalva's maneuver following a tonsillectomy.
These patients should supplement aerobic exercise with resistance training but should never do isometric contractions, which produce Valsalva's maneuver. "These patients should not be lifting heavier weights.
Other requirements include: no hesitation or coughing during the test, no Valsalva's maneuver, no obstruction of the mouthpiece by the tongue or teeth, and no air leak or early termination of effort.
He was then sent to the Ear, Nose, and Throat Service, where we confirmed that his subcutaneous emphysema could be brought on by Valsalva's maneuver We performed suspension laryngoscopy and detected two orifices of fistular tracts next to the right vallecula and three at the root of the epiglottis.
Thus, lowering the head position or performing Valsalva's maneuver clinically precipitates intermittent proptosis.
Clinical presentations feature a firm, noncompressible mass that does not expand during crying or during Valsalva's maneuver (negative Furstenburg's test), unlike nasal encephalocele.
The eustachian tube function test (Valsalva's maneuver) was negative on the right and positive on the left.
The woman denied a history of head trauma or vertigo during Valsalva's maneuver. She had no antecedent illness or history of ear disease.