valgus

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talipes

 [tal´ĭ-pēz]
a deformity in which the foot is twisted out of normal position; see also clubfoot and see illustration. It may have an abnormally high longitudinal arch (talipes cavus) or it may be in dorsiflexion (talipes calcaneus), in plantar flexion (talipes equinus), abducted and everted (talipes valgus or flatfoot), adducted and inverted (talipes varus), or various combinations of these (talipes calcaneovalgus, talipes calcaneovarus, talipes equinovalgus, or talipes equinovarus).



There are several theories as to the cause of clubfoot. A familial tendency or arrested growth during fetal life may contribute to its development, or it may be caused by a defect in the ovum. It sometimes accompanies meningomyelocele as a result of paralysis. In mild clubfoot there are slight changes in the structure of the foot; more severe cases involve orthopedic deformities of both the foot and leg. Although clubfoot is usually congenital, an occasional case in an older child may be caused by injury or poliomyelitis.

Treatment varies according to the severity of the deformity. Milder cases may be corrected with casts that are changed periodically, the foot being manipulated into position each time the cast is changed so that it gradually assumes normal position. A specially designed splint may also be used, made of two plates attached to shoes with a crossbar between the plates and special set screws so that the angulation of the foot can be changed as necessary. More severe deformities require surgery of the tendons and bones, followed by the application of a cast to maintain proper position of the joint.
Talipes.

val·gus

(val'gŭs), This form of the adjective is used only with masculine nouns (hallux valgus, plural halluces valgi). With feminine nouns the form valga is used (coxa valga, plural coxae valgae), and with neuter nouns the form valgum (genu valgum, plural genua valga). Do not confuse this word with varus.
Latin adjective describing any joint in an extremity that is deformed such that the more distal of the two bones forming the joint deviates away from the midline, as in knock-knee.
[Mod. L. turned outward, fr. L. bow-legged]

valgus

/val·gus/ (val´gus) [L.] bent out, twisted; denoting a deformity in which the angulation is away from the midline of the body, as in talipes valgus. The meanings of valgus and varus are often reversed.

valgus

(văl′gəs)
adj.
1. Characterized by an abnormal outward turning of a bone, especially of the hip, knee, or foot.
2. Knock-kneed.
n.
A valgus bone.

val′goid′ (-goid′) adj.

valgus

[val′gəs]
Etymology: L, bent
describing an abnormal position in which a part of a limb is bent or twisted outward, away from the midline, such as the heel of the foot in talipes valgus (splayfoot). Compare varus. See also hallux valgus.

valgus

Orthopedics Fixation of an extremity in the position it would assume if everted; if in the frontal plane, the plantar surface is directed away from the midline. Cf Varus.

val·gus

(val'gŭs)
Descriptive of any of the paired joints of the extremities with a static angular deformity in which the bone distal to the joint deviates laterally from the longitudinal axis of the proximal bone, and from the midline of the body, when the subject is in anatomic position. The adjective valgus is attached sometimes to the name of the joint (cubitus valgus) and sometimes to the name of the part just distal to the joint (hallux valgus). The gender of the adjective matches that of the Latin noun to which it is joined; thus, cubitus, hallux, metatarsus, pes, talipes valgus; coxa, manus, talipomanus valga; genu valgum.
[Mod. L. turned outward, fr. L. bow-legged]
Enlarge picture
BOWLEG: In medical usage, referred to as “varus knee” or “genu varum.”

valgus

(val'gus) [L. valgus, valga, valgum bent, bent outward, bowleg(ged)]
Bent or turned outward, used esp. of deformities in which the most distal anatomical part is angled outward and away from the midline of the body. The classical Latin adjective valgus, valga, valgum means “bowleg” or “bowlegged” and applies to the appearance of the defect. The modern medical Latin adjective applies to the cause of the defect; thus a “valgus knee” is caused by the outward bendingof the tibia and fibula (away from the center of the body), resulting in “genu valgum, ” or “knock-knee.”
See: illustration; varus

valgus

positional variant characterized by turning outwards of a part

valgus

[L.] bent outward; twisted; denoting a deformity in which the angulation is away from the midline of the body, as in coxa valga.
Enlarge picture
Carpal valgus in a lamb. By permission from Smith BP, Large Animal Internal Medicine, Mosby, 2001
References in periodicals archive ?
Heel valgus deformity was diagnosed by measurement of the ankle between a vertical line down from the middle of the popliteal fossa and a line between the ankle and the heel.
Forefoot erosion scores in the radiographic evaluation were observed to be higher in RA patients with heel valgus deformity when compared with patients without heel valgus (p<0.
Taking into consideration that erosions occur during the first two years of the disease period leading to significant pain, it would be logical to think that progression of valgus deformity in a foot with erosions is an adaptive process.
It had maintained good body condition, and the valgus deformity of the wings was considerably improved.
1,2) The etiology involves a valgus deformity of the growing metacarpal bones or a rotation in the carpal joints resulting in dorsolateral rotation of the primary flight feathers, which protrude when the wing is folded to the body during rest.
A similar valgus deformity of the metacarpal bones and carpal joint was successfully treated by one of the authors (N.
Late results after correction of hallux valgus deformity by basilar phalangeal osteotomy.
Results of Akin type proximal phalangeal osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus deformity.
Large displacement distal chevron osteotomy for the correction of hallux valgus deformity.
Similarly, if it passes lateral to the midline of the knee, then a valgus deformity exists, and the lateral compartment will be over loaded.
Similarly, the investigators found that patients with a valgus deformity had a 4.
For patients with grade 2 disease, initially, but who had a valgus deformity, the odds ratio of progressing was 2.