valence


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valence

 [va´lens]
1. a positive number that represents the combining power of an element in a chemical compound, i.e., the number of bonds each atom of that element makes with other atoms. In this most general sense “valence” has been superseded by the concept “oxidation number.” However, “valence” is still used to indicate (1) the number of covalent bonds formed by an atom in a covalent compound or (2) the charge on a monatomic or polyatomic molecule.
2. in immunology, the number of antigen binding sites possessed by an antibody molecule, two per immunoglobulin monomer, or the number of antigenic determinants possessed by an antigen, usually a large number.

va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -len-sē),
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons); for example, in HCl, chlorine is monovalent; in H2O, oxygen is bivalent; in NH3, nitrogen is trivalent.
[L. valentia, strength]

valence

(vā′ləns) also

valency

(-lən-sē)
n. pl. val·lences also val·lencies
1. Chemistry
a. The combining capacity of an atom or group of atoms as determined by the number of electrons it can lose, add, or share when it reacts with other atoms or groups. Also called oxidation state.
b. An integer used to represent this capacity, which may be given as positive or negative depending on whether electrons are lost or gained, respectively: The valences of copper are +1 and +2.
2. The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen.
3. The number of different antigens contained in a vaccine, corresponding to the number of pathogens that it is active against.
4. Psychology The degree of attraction or aversion that an individual feels toward a specific object or event.

va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -ē)
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons); e.g., in HCl, chlorine is monovalent; in H2O, oxygen is bivalent; in NH3, nitrogen is trivalent.
[L. valentia, strength]

va·lence

, valency (vā'lĕns, -sē)
The combining power of one atom of an element (or a radical), that of the hydrogen atom being the unit of comparison, determined by the number of electrons in the outer shell of the atom (v. electrons).
[L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
This peak comes from the transition between valence band and conduction band.
The horizontal dimension represents the valence of the emotion, i.e., the right side represents a positive emotion, and the left side represents a negative emotion.
In fact, the distribution of the valence and arousal ratings of painting and music stimuli is shown in Figure 1 and our results were similar to the distribution of the Affective Picture System described by Lang et al., (1997).
Ian McLean has been appointed as Valence Industries' Project Manager at Uley.
QHS is at the forefront in redefining how care is delivered, measured and paid for in this country, said Valence Health CEO Phil Kamp.
The web-based software product selects a thumbnail based on neuroimaging data on object perception and valence, crowd sourced behavioral data and proprietary computational analyses of large amounts of video streams.
'This extension demonstrates the continued acceptance of Valence's batteries within the medical industry.
Nevertheless, Valence says that it had supply problems last fiscal year.
Under the agreement, Valence Technology will serve as the exclusive battery supplier for all new BA(c)nA(c)teau Group hybrid-electric vessels that incorporate the ZF Marine hybrid drive systems.
1 uses four emotion recognition sensors for each of disabled individual: the ECG (Electrocardiogram); the SCR (skin conductance response); the STH (skin temperature of head), and the S[T.sub.F] (skin temperature of finger) to provide HR (heart rate), HR[V.sub.H] (heart rate variability for the range of 0.15 to 0.4 Hz), HR[V.sub.L] (heart rate variability for the range of 0.015 to 0.15 Hz), SCR, S[T.sub.H], and S[T.sub.F] inputs for defining fuzzy values of arousal and valence (Fig.
University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio has received a patent for solid corrosion-inhibiting conversion coating formed on a substrate metal, the conversion coating is comprised of a rare earth element and an inorganic valence stabilizer combined to form a rare earth/valence stabilizer complex within the solid corrosion-inhibiting conversion coating, wherein the rare earth element is selected from cerium, praseodymium, terbium, or a combination thereof, and at least one rare earth element is in the tetravalent oxidation state in the rare earth/valence stabilizer complex in the solid corrosion-inhibiting conversion coating.