vaginal dryness

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vaginal dryness

Gynecology
1. Atrophic vaginitis, see there.
2. ↓ vaginal lubrication or premature loss of same.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kilmer explained that RF heating of the skin and mucosa provides immediate contraction of collagen, long-term stimulation of new collagen production, and increased blood flow and restoration of nerve signaling, which results in normal vaginal lubrication.
Enumeration data were analyzed using the Chi-square test, and the logistic regression multivariate analysis model was well suited for the single- or multi-potential risk factors for FSD such as dysaphrodisia, arousal difficulties, vaginal lubrication problems, orgasmic dysfunction, sexual satisfaction disorders, and dyspareunia.
PROBLEM MENOPAUSE ISSUES Falling oestrogen levels in the lead-up to and after the menopause cause women to produce less vaginal lubrication.
Estrogen, a female hormone, helps keep vaginal tissue healthy by maintaining normal vaginal lubrication, tissue elasticity and acidity.
7) Moreover, regular sexual activity--either alone or with a partner--can help maintain vaginal lubrication and elasticity.
The presence of at least one sexual problem (Reduced sexual desire, reduced vaginal arousal, reduced vaginal lubrication, reduced frequency of orgasm, dissatisfaction with sexual life and dyspareunia) was statistically significant more common after birth.
For example, estradiol not only promotes vaginal lubrication, but also helps maintain adequate blood flow to the vagina and clitoris.
For women, having sex increases vaginal lubrication blood flow, and elasticity, she says, all of which make sex feel better and help you crave more of it.
The authors concluded that women prefer intact to circumcised sexual partners for sexual enjoyment, citing the mobile sheath of the intact penis as a potential anatomic explanation as it is believed to minimize friction against the vaginal wall, allowing for the maintenance of vaginal lubrication (O'Hara & O'Hara, 1999).
The most common include: Sleep disturbances, anxiety with no discernable cause, inability to concentrate, mood swings, forgetfulness, menstrual irregularities, less vaginal lubrication, lower sex drive, some hot flushes or night sweats, and dry skin, hair and nails.
Even in milder cases, dyspareunia and reduced vaginal lubrication during sexual arousal commonly result in deterioration of a patient's sexual quality of life, with aggravation and intensification of preexisting disorders of female sexual response.
This practice is also known to assist in reducing incontinence, increasing sexual pleasure, helping to balance hormones, increasing vaginal lubrication and dexterity, and supporting us in becoming familiar with the inner landscape of our vaginal canal.