vestibular evoked myogenic potential technique

(redirected from VEMP test)

vestibular evoked myogenic potential technique

A technique used to assess the function of the otolithic organs—utricle and saccule—of the inner ear, which complements caloric testing and other forms of inner ear (vestibular apparatus) testing. In contrast to other forms of vestibular testing, VEMP assesses non-auditory parts of the labyrinth and requires kinematic stimuli provided by an electromechanical shaker.
 
Indications
Used to assess local disease, such as superior canal dehiscence syndrome, Ménière's disease, vestibular neuritis and otosclerosis, as well as more generalised disease (e.g., multiple sclerosis).
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, VEMP test outcomes were found in nine patient medical records (not found in the record of patient No.
VEMP test results were easily obtained in all subjects.
A VEMP test uses loud sounds to evoke a muscle reflex contraction in the neck and eye muscles, triggered by the vestibular system - the system responsible for our balance.
For example, the VEMP test uses very high sound levels, and may in fact cause permanent hearing damage itself.
The VEMP test was first described by Colebacht and Halmagyi (3) in 1992 and has been widely used in recent years.
The VEMP test was performed using the Neuro-Audio device (Version 2010, Neurosoft, Ivanovo, Russia).
There was canal paralysis in 15 of 19 patients whose VEMP test was pathological.
When the situation in which any one of the VEMP test or the v-HIT test was pathological was compared with the canal paralysis, the findings obtained are as follows: (i) There is VEMP [+ or -] v-HIT pathology in 17 (77.3%) of 22 patients with canal paralysis.
The nerve of tumor origin has been shown to be correlated with the size and location of the tumor.[sup][17],[18] Some results also suggested that the VEMP test could be useful for the diagnosis of AN, especially for classifying ANs according to the involved nerves.[sup][3] In this study, the nerve of tumor origin in 38 of the 106 patients could not be determined.
Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors, the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.
For this study, we obtained the preoperative and postoperative results of caloric and VEMP tests. Furthermore, we also evaluated the correlations of those with the intraoperative findings regarding the nerve of tumor origin and hearing level in 106 VS patients.
VEMP tests were recorded using the ECLIPSE Objective Hearing Test Platform (Interacoustics, Copenhagen, Denmark).