VCUG


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms.

VCUG

Abbreviation for voiding cystourethrogram.

VCUG

Voiding cystourethrography, see there.

VCUG

Abbreviation for voiding cystourethrogram.

cystourethrography

(sis″tō-ūr″ē-throg′ră-fē) [ cysto- + urethrography, ]
Radiography of the bladder and urethra with a radiopaque contrast medium. cystourethrographic (-ū-rē″thrŏ-graf′ik), adjective

chain cystourethrography

Radiography in which a sterile beaded radiopaque chain is introduced into the bladder by a special catheter so that one end of the chain is in the bladder and the other extends outside via the urethra. This examination is useful in demonstrating anatomical relationships, esp. in women with persistent urinary incontinence.

voiding cystourethrography

Abbreviation: VCUG
Cystourethrography done before, during, and after voiding.

Patient care

A VCUG is used to identify vesicoureteral reflux in children between the ages of 2 and 24 months if they experience two or more urinary tract infections. The test may also be used to evaluate the bladder for fistulae, foreign bodies, obstruction, trauma, or tumors. Patients, esp. children, benefit from analgesia and anxiolysis before and during the procedure. The patient, caregivers, and professional staff are shielded from radiation exposure. The patient is placed in a frog-legged, supine position. A urinary catheter is inserted into the urethra under sterile conditions. Contrast agent (warmed to body temperature) is infused into the bladder. Fluoroscopic images of the lower urinary tract are recorded during voiding, which is often accomplished with the patient standing upright after the bladder is filled.

CAUTION!

A VCUG should not be performed during pregnancy (because of the risk of radiation exposure) or during active urinary infections. Any allergy to the contrast medium used during the procedure should be assessed before it is infused.

voiding cystourethrography

Abbreviation: VCUG
Cystourethrography done before, during, and after voiding.

Patient care

A VCUG is used to identify vesicoureteral reflux in children between the ages of 2 and 24 months if they experience two or more urinary tract infections. The test may also be used to evaluate the bladder for fistulae, foreign bodies, obstruction, trauma, or tumors. Patients, esp. children, benefit from analgesia and anxiolysis before and during the procedure. The patient, caregivers, and professional staff are shielded from radiation exposure. The patient is placed in a frog-legged, supine position. A urinary catheter is inserted into the urethra under sterile conditions. Contrast agent (warmed to body temperature) is infused into the bladder. Fluoroscopic images of the lower urinary tract are recorded during voiding, which is often accomplished with the patient standing upright after the bladder is filled.

CAUTION!

A VCUG should not be performed during pregnancy (because of the risk of radiation exposure) or during active urinary infections. Any allergy to the contrast medium used during the procedure should be assessed before it is infused.
References in periodicals archive ?
VCUG reports were available for 161 patients (88.9%).
Caption: FIGURE 3: VCUG six weeks after urethral repair surgery showing normal bladder and urethra.
The imaging guidelines in use at the pediatric division of our hospital during the study period recommended the performance of US examination during hospitalization or shortly after hospitalization in all cases of UTI in young infants, a VCUG examination after 6-8 weeks following the discharge from the hospital.
The number needed to test "should be very helpful for physicians when they are deciding whether to get a VCUG on a neonate under 2 months if they have a normal renal ultrasound," Dr.
A VCUG provides more anatomic details, particularly of the bladder and urethra, but its disadvantages are radiation, the requirement for vesical catheterization, and a susceptibility to UTls (10,11).
Classically, the prenatal diagnosis of hydronephrosis leads to postnatal investigations, including sonography, VCUG, and isotopic renography [17,20].
Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) should not routinely be performed after a first UTI.
If postnatal ultrasound confirms the presence of hydronephrosis, then the next study that will generally be performed is a voiding cystoure-throgram, or VCUG. This study is performed by placing a tiny lubricated catheter through the urethra and into the bladder.
Voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) showed large bladder diverticulum with no evidence of reflux and normal posterior urethra.
TABLE 1 Lower urinary tract symptoms are also seen with these disorders (31) DISORDER FINDINGS Bladder calculi Hematuria, ultrasonography finding Bladder neck dyssynergia LUTS in younger patients with normal prostate size, diagnosed by cystoscopy or VCUG Overactive bladder Urgency with possible urge incontinence Prostate cancer Finding in DRE, elevated serum PSA Prostatitis Tender prostate gland Stricture of the bladder neck Prior invasive treatment Urinary bladder cancer Hematuria, abnormal cytological finding Urethral stricture Box-shaped flow curve on urinary flow-rate measurement DRE, digital rectal examination; LUTS, lower urinary tract symptoms; PSA, prostate-specific antigen; VCUG, voiding cystourethrogram.
Although not particularly painful from an adult perspective, urethral catheterization for urologic imaging studies such as voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) has been known to cause considerable distress in children (Stashinko & Goldberger, 1998).
However, a renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG), a specialized X-ray to examine the urinary system at age seven months were both reported as normal, following which antibiotics were discontinued, and she was discharged with no further follow up.