VCUG


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VCUG

Abbreviation for voiding cystourethrogram.

VCUG

Voiding cystourethrography, see there.

VCUG

Abbreviation for voiding cystourethrogram.

cystourethrography

(sis″tō-ūr″ē-throg′ră-fē) [ cysto- + urethrography, ]
Radiography of the bladder and urethra with a radiopaque contrast medium. cystourethrographic (-ū-rē″thrŏ-graf′ik), adjective

chain cystourethrography

Radiography in which a sterile beaded radiopaque chain is introduced into the bladder by a special catheter so that one end of the chain is in the bladder and the other extends outside via the urethra. This examination is useful in demonstrating anatomical relationships, esp. in women with persistent urinary incontinence.

voiding cystourethrography

Abbreviation: VCUG
Cystourethrography done before, during, and after voiding.

Patient care

A VCUG is used to identify vesicoureteral reflux in children between the ages of 2 and 24 months if they experience two or more urinary tract infections. The test may also be used to evaluate the bladder for fistulae, foreign bodies, obstruction, trauma, or tumors. Patients, esp. children, benefit from analgesia and anxiolysis before and during the procedure. The patient, caregivers, and professional staff are shielded from radiation exposure. The patient is placed in a frog-legged, supine position. A urinary catheter is inserted into the urethra under sterile conditions. Contrast agent (warmed to body temperature) is infused into the bladder. Fluoroscopic images of the lower urinary tract are recorded during voiding, which is often accomplished with the patient standing upright after the bladder is filled.

CAUTION!

A VCUG should not be performed during pregnancy (because of the risk of radiation exposure) or during active urinary infections. Any allergy to the contrast medium used during the procedure should be assessed before it is infused.

voiding cystourethrography

Abbreviation: VCUG
Cystourethrography done before, during, and after voiding.

Patient care

A VCUG is used to identify vesicoureteral reflux in children between the ages of 2 and 24 months if they experience two or more urinary tract infections. The test may also be used to evaluate the bladder for fistulae, foreign bodies, obstruction, trauma, or tumors. Patients, esp. children, benefit from analgesia and anxiolysis before and during the procedure. The patient, caregivers, and professional staff are shielded from radiation exposure. The patient is placed in a frog-legged, supine position. A urinary catheter is inserted into the urethra under sterile conditions. Contrast agent (warmed to body temperature) is infused into the bladder. Fluoroscopic images of the lower urinary tract are recorded during voiding, which is often accomplished with the patient standing upright after the bladder is filled.

CAUTION!

A VCUG should not be performed during pregnancy (because of the risk of radiation exposure) or during active urinary infections. Any allergy to the contrast medium used during the procedure should be assessed before it is infused.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of these 11 re-injected ureters, 9 (82%) were successfully treated with the second injection and 2 had persistent failure on VCUG at 3 months.
During this study and in our daily practice, VCUG is not routinely performed 1 year following the procedure as we make efforts to apply the ALARA principle and to reduce urethral manipulations on our patients.
We have shown that VCUG reports, when performed at free-standing pediatric hospitals, consistently contain more useful and pertinent information for doctors, which showcases the importance of pediatric expertise.
The study also states that, unlike CT scans and MRI studies where all of the imaging data is recorded (and all images can be reexamined or reinterpreted), radiology departments only store a few representative VCUG images at study completion.
Strategies to improve the completeness of VCUG reports would help the radiographic assessment, improve the quality of the report and reduce the harm from diagnostic radiation in these children," the study states.
Put another way, free-standing, pediatric hospitals consistently reported more complete VCUG test findings than other types of hospitals.
Ultrasound, IVU, VCUG and MRI may be necessary for adequate assessment.
Given 2 previous unsuccessful attempts at VCUG and very significant patient-related anxiety, urodynamic studies were not performed.