uterine prolapse


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to uterine prolapse: cystocele

uterine prolapse

Pelvic floor hernia; pudendal hernia Gynecology Falling or sliding of the uterus from its normal position in the pelvic cavity into the vaginal canal; the uterus is normally supported by pelvic connective tissue, pubococcygeus muscle, and uterine ligaments which, when weakened allow the uterus to descend into the vaginal canal Etiology Childbirth trauma, especially from large babies or abrupt L&D, loss of muscle tone due to aging and ↓ estrogens Risk factors Multiparity, white, obesity, excess coughing due to chronic bronchitis and asthma, constipation and abdominal muscle strain, large uterine fibroids
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Uterine prolapse

Bulging of the uterus into the vagina.
Mentioned in: Pelvic Relaxation
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Uterine prolapse is a common case in nonpregnant older women; however, uterine prolapse complicating pregnancy is a rare event, which either exists before or has an acute onset during pregnancy.
Symptomatology of the Cases Symptoms Number of Patients Percentage (%) Asymptomatic 211 30.1 White discharge per vaginum 379 54.2 Lower abdominal pain 103 14.7 Uterine prolapse 4 0.6 Post-menopausal bleeding 3 0.4 Total 700 100 Table 3.
This case report describes two cross-breed cats with unilateral uterine prolapse. The cats were referred to the Small Animal Clinic of Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Istanbul University two weeks apart with a protrusion of a mass through vagina.
The cytological findings such as squamous metaplasia, hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, and reactive cellular changes were noted specifically in patients with or without uterine prolapse. Data were analyzed statistically to see the significant relation of these findings with prolapse of uterus.
Can a ring pessary have a lasting effect to reverse uterine prolapse even after its removal?
* There are 2 other cases in the literature of women who, like our patient, had uterine prolapse that went untreated until they were in renal failure.
"Laparoscopic suture hysteropexy for uterine prolapse." Obstet Gynecol.
Despite huge investment in the prevention of uterine prolapse, the effectiveness of these programs have been frequently questioned.
Other conditions that are prevented by removal of the female reproductive organs include: pyometra, a life-threatening disorder marked by the accumulation of pus in the uterus; vaginal hyperplasia, a gross swelling of the vaginal wall that occurs during the normal heat cycle; uterine torsion, a twisting of the uterus that may occur late in pregnancy; uterine prolapse, the bulging of the uterus into the vaginal tract; and a variety of infections, cysts and cancers of the uterus.
About 600,000 women per year undergo hysterectomy for indications including fibroids, abnormal bleeding, endometriosis, and uterine prolapse, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and about half of them have both ovaries removed at that time to prevent ovarian cancer.
Meanwhile, 30 women underwent operation for uterine prolapse at an obstetrics health camp in Birendranagar, Surkhet.The camp was organised by Sushma Koirala Memorial Trust, Nepalgunj, with the cooperation of Midwest Region Health Directorate, Surkhet.
Other conditions that are prevented include vaginal hyperplasia, a gross swelling of the vaginal wall that occurs during the normal heat cycle; uterine torsion, a twisting of the uterus that may occur late in pregnancy; uterine prolapse, the bulging of the uterus into the vagina; and a variety of infections, cysts and cancers of the uterus and ovaries.