urology

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urology

 [u-rol´ah-je]
the medical specialty concerned with the urinary system in both male and female and the genital organs in the male. adj., adj urolog´ic, urolog´ical.

u·rol·o·gy

(yū-rol'ŏ-jē),
The medical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the genitourinary tract.
[uro- + G. logos, study]

urology

/urol·o·gy/ (u-rol´ah-je) the medical specialty concerned with the urinary system in the male and female and genital organs in the male.urolog´icurolog´ical

urology

(yo͝o-rŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract and urogenital system.

ur′o·log′ic (yo͝or′ə-lŏj′ĭk), ur′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
u·rol′o·gist n.

urology

[yoo͡rol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, ouron + logos, science
the branch of medicine concerned with the study of the anatomy, physiology, disorders, and care of the urinary tract in men and women and of the male genital tract. urological, adj.

urology

The subspecialty of medicine dedicated to the urogenital tract, primarily of men. See Urologist.

ur·ol·o·gy

(yūr-ol'ŏ-jē)
The medical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the genitourinary tract.
[uro- + G. logos, study]

urology

The scientific study of the disorders of the kidneys and the urine drainage system.

ur·ol·o·gy

(yūr-ol'ŏ-jē)
The medical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the genitourinary tract.
[uro- + G. logos, study]

urology (yoorol´əjē),

n the branch of medicine concerned with the study of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the urinary tract, with the care of the urinary tract of men and women; and with the care of the male genital tract.

urology

the branch of veterinary medicine dealing with the urinary system.

Patient discussion about urology

Q. Should I do surgery for varicoceles? I went to an urologist and he recommended surgery, but I don’t know if I should do this…is it dangerous? Can I live with the varicocele?

A. I don’t see your problem, you said an urologist advised you to do so- that should be enough no? if you don’t trust him, go and get a second opinion. The surgery is not that bad, an hour later and you are walking out. Vary small risk of complication. I did it and it was fine.

Q. Has anyone ever had Epididymitis? I was just diagnosed with it and want to know what to expect. Thanks

A. i had an ultrasound done once before,it revealed nothing was wrong,then i had a lower gi,it also showed nothing,at the present moment,my testicules are swollen a little,
slight pain,tenderness,problems with urination,and not
urinating very often,feel as if i"m not completing my
urination,feels like i have a bladder infection,with
an epididymis infection,this makes the 7th time i"ve
had this,i"d like to know why i keep getting it??? and
will it ever stay away??? is there a complete cure?
would a vasecemy cure it???

More discussions about urology
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the Exact Imaging platform, urologists will now be able to visualize suspicious areas in the prostate and specifically target biopsies at those areas in addition to performing systematic trans-rectal ultrasound biopsy protocols.
Secondly, due to these patients' complex urologic issues, not all urologists may accept elective referrals of TSCI.
We used robust standard errors clustered on treating urologists to account for clustering within treating urologists.
The shrinking number of urologists could affect mortality rates, as research has demonstrated an association between a higher density of urologists in a defined area and lower mortality from prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer.
Its mission is to enable urologists in all nations, through international cooperation in education and research, to apply the highest standards of urological care to their patients.
Possibly as soon as 2014, urologists will have additional biomarkers available to more precisely determine the aggressiveness of a patient's cancer, minimizing or even eliminating the USPSTF's concerns regarding over-diagnosis and over-treatment.
Conclusions: Our results show that laparoscopic practice steadily increases in frequency and that urologists are willing to substitute open surgery for laparoscopic surgery.
South African urologists are not trained in posterior compartment prolapse during their formal postgraduate training.
All practising gynaecologists and urologists know that AVP often coexists with prolapse in the apical and/or posterior vaginal compartments.
The urologists are more procedure oriented; they take a year of surgery training before they start urology training.
It is important to consider however, that there are differences between urologists' and oncologists' reporting of patient shares for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer; for example, urologists say that just over a fifth of their second-line MCRPC patients currently receive Zytiga compared with more than a third according to surveyed oncologists.
The states with the highest number of practicing urologists include California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas.