urologic disease

(redirected from Urological Disease)

urologic disease

A generic term for surgical disease of the kidneys, bladder and urinary tract.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk factors for significant diseases in patients with microscopic hematuria include male gender, age over 35 years, smoking history, analgesic abuse, exposure to chemicals (benzenes or aromatic amines), history of gross hematuria, history of urological disease, history of urinary tract infection, and history of pelvic irradiation (3,5,8).
Their care however will be ongoing and could potentially involve more surgeries and procedures in the future." Bladder exstrophy is a rare urological disease that affects one in 50,000 babies.
Upon deteriorating his health condition; he was admitted to Sindh Institute of Urological disease and Transplant in Karachi.
Biomarkers for pediatric urological disease. Curr Opin Urol 2009 Jul;19(4):397-401.
This update of the 2006 edition adds chapters on the treatment of HIV/AIDS and the management of urological disease. Following introductory chapters on principles of the field, chapters treat drugs for specific types of diseases, prevention in travel medicine, and pain.
According to the American Foundation for Urological Disease, as many as 10 million visits are made to physicians each year to seek treatment for UTIs.
Any pregnant woman with signs of urological disease must be urgently sent to a urologist, while we feel that pregnant women with a history of lithiasis should have at least a urological consultation during pregnancy.
BUF director Sally Walton said: "We are extremely grateful to Cambridge Laboratories for supporting BUF's work and enabling our charity to make a real difference to the management and treatment of urological disease."
A medical history and physical examination are still the reference standard of diagnosis; a radiological evaluation (ultrasonography and computed tomography) can only be used for determining the extent of the disease.4 Patients who have medical illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis of the liver, alcoholism, uraemia, malignancy, colorectal infection or urological disease, are at higher risk of developing the disease.
(3) Taken together, there is a critical need for both undergraduate and graduate medical education to manage future urological disease.