urogynecologist


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urogynecologist

(ūr″ō-gīn″ĕ-kol′ŏ-jĭst) [ uro- + gynecologist]
A gynecologist who specializes in the care of women with urinary problems, such as stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, or pelvic organ prolapse.

Urogynecologist

A physician that deals with women's health, especially with the health of women's reproductive organs and urinary tract.
Mentioned in: Overactive Bladder
References in periodicals archive ?
People are afraid of it, people think it causes more bleeding, and maybe there's a cost issue," Andrey Petrikovets, MD, a urogynecologist in Los Angeles, said in an interview.
Based on this description, the urogynecologist ascertains that the mesh is located in the anterior vaginal wall (A09.1.04.006), with passage of anchoring arms through the bilateral sacrospinous ligaments (A03.6.03.007) and retropubic space (A10.1.01.003).
An evaluation with a urogynecologist through the Integrated Pelvic Health & Urogynecology Program at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital can lead to numerous treatment options that can help you meet your goals.
Sherrer was referred to a urogynecologist who found that part of the Solyx had migrated from where it was initially placed.
"One of the most gratifying aspects of being a urogynecologist is caring for a patient who believes she is the only person in the world with pelvic organ prolapse.
Given the impact on quality of life, ACOG and WPSI are now recommending that urinary incontinence be addressed by your primary physician, who can then determine if a referral to a urogynecologist is needed."
A urogynecologist, board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery, Downing specializes in the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of women with pelvic floor disorders, which the National Institutes of Health estimates 25 percent of U.S.
The physician who cares for incontinence patients, a urologist or urogynecologist, does the procedure under local anesthetic.
She was initially prescribed vaginal estrogen, as supported by evidence from Cochrane reviews [25, 26], and referral to a urogynecologist was considered.
After one month, she was referred to the outpatient clinic to see an urogynecologist. She was in pain and was not able to empty her bladder properly through the night.
In 2015, Amanda Clark, MD, a urogynecologist at the Kaiser Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., and her colleagues surveyed women aged 55 years and older about their vulvar, vaginal, urinary, and sexual symptoms within 2 weeks of a well-woman visit to their primary care physician or gynecologist in the Kaiser system.