uric acid

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uric

 [u´rik]
uric acid the end product of purine metabolism or oxidation in the body. It is present in blood in a concentration of about 5 mg/100 ml and is excreted in the urine in amounts of a little less than 1 g per day. In gout there is an excess of uric acid in the blood, and its salts, the urates, form insoluble stones in the urinary tract, or may crystallize and form deposits (see tophus) in the joints and tissues. The presence of high concentrations of uric acid in the urine is significant in the diagnosis of gout, but is of little significance in urinary disorders.

u·ric ac·id

(yūr'ik as'id),
2,6,8-Trioxypurine; white crystals, poorly soluble, contained in solution in the urine of mammals and in solid form in the urine of birds and reptiles; sometimes solidified in small masses as stones or crystals or in larger concretions as calculi; with sodium and other bases it forms urates; elevated levels associated with gout.

uric acid

/uric ac·id/ (u´rik) the water-insoluble end product of primate purine metabolism; deposition of it as crystals in the joints and kidneys causes gout.

uric acid

n.
A semisolid compound, C5H4N4O3, that is a nitrogenous end product of protein and purine metabolism and is the chief nitrogenous component of the urine in birds, terrestrial reptiles, and insects.

uric acid

[yoo͡r′ik]
a product of the metabolism of protein that is present in the blood and excreted in the urine. Normal adult levels of blood uric acid range from 2.0 to 8.5 mg/dL, with slightly higher values for elderly patients. See also gout, kidney, liver, purine, urine.

uric acid

A small purine metabolite excreted primarily by the kidneys, less by the GI tract; ↑ UA occurs in gout, which primarly affects acral joints, associated with deposition of UA crystals in various tissues; ↑ UA occurs in rapid cell turnover–eg, cancer–leukemia, metastases, myeloma, as well as in alcoholism, dehydration due to diuretics, DM, hyperlipoproteinemia, lead poisoning, renal failure, rarely, idiopathic Ref range Serum, ♂, 3.6-8.3 mg/dL; ♀, 2.2-6.8 mg/dL. See Gout. Cf Synovial fluid analysis.
Enlarge picture
CLUMP OF URIC ACID CRYSTALS (×400)

uric acid

C5H4N4O3, a crystalline acid occurring as an end product of purine metabolism. It is formed from purine bases derived from nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). It is a common constituent of urinary stones and gouty tophi. See: illustration
CAS # 69-93-2

Output

Uric acid must be excreted because it cannot be metabolized. Uric acid output should be between 0.8 and 1g/day if the patient is on an ordinary diet.

Increased elimination is observed after ingestion of proteins and nitrogenous foods, after exercise, after administration of cytotoxic agents, and in gout and leukemia. Decreased elimination is observed in kidney failure, lead poisoning, and in those who eat a protein-free diet.

See also: acid

uric acid

The main end product of PURINE metabolism. Uric acid is derived from ADENINE and GUANINE, two of the purines in DNA and RNA (nucleic acids). An excess of uric acid salts in the body can cause GOUT and kidney stones.

uric acid

see URATE.

Uric acid

A compound resulting from the body's breakdown of purine. It is normally present in human urine only in small amounts.
Mentioned in: Uric Acid Tests

uric acid

white, crystalline, poorly soluble byproduct of protein metabolism; converted to urea by enzyme action

u·ric ac·id

(yūr'ik as'id)
White crystals, poorly soluble, contained in solution in the urine of mammals.

uric acid (yoor´ik),

n a product of protein metabolism and present in the blood and urine. See also gout.

uric

pertaining to the urine.

uric acid
the end product of purine metabolism or oxidation in the body in species other than dogs which metabolize uric acid to allantoin (except Dalmatians). Amounts of more than 1 mg/100 ml of uric acid in the blood are an indication of hepatic insufficiency. In birds excess amounts of uric acid and urates in tissue occur in visceral gout.
uric acid calculi
see urate urolith.