Urate crystals

Urate crystals

Crystals formed by high levels of uric acid in the blood.
Mentioned in: Gout
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Gout is caused by a buildup of uric acid that forms urate crystals. "In 90 percent of patients, the crystals build up because their kidneys don't excrete uric acid normally; in 10 percent of patients, their bodies make too much uric acid," says Dr.
However, the finding of monosodium urate crystals allows the accurate diagnosis of gout.
In addition to the unclear ACR and ACP guidelines of AH management, the literature contains conflicting reports regarding the usefulness of treating AH, both to reduce the risk of progression to gout and to prevent complications such as renal deposits of urate crystals. (15-19) Cost-benefit analyses for both symptomatic treatments and ULT should be taken into consideration.
In addition to the joint damage, urate crystals can also deposit in other organs of the body, and if left unmanaged, gout can lead to significant tissue damage.
Hyperuricemia is the major predisposing condition for gout, a disease that most commonly manifests with acute flares of arthritis, and can also lead to chronic arthritis and joint damage and palpable deposits of urate crystals in the skin.
Gout is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis, caused by the buildup of urate crystals in a joint.
Only half of the studies confirmed the diagnosis of gout by the presence of monosodium urate crystals within joint spaces.
Left untreated, gout can lead to more severe conditions, including recurrent gout, which can erode and eventually destroy a joint; advanced gout, leading to nodules of urate crystals on fingers, hands, feet, elbows or Achilles tendons; or kidneys tones, which develop from urate crystals collecting in the urinary tract.
Gout is a systemic inflammatory disease caused by deposition of monosodium urate crystals within synovial or periarticular tissue.
Alternatively, dehydration resulting in prerenal azotemia and accumulation of uric acid may have altered systemic pH; this is supported by the presence of urate crystals in the kidney (i.e., nephric gout) which is often a result of dehydration in avian species.
The basic pathophysiological feature of gout is the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid of the joints following longstanding hyperuricemia.
The saturation level of urate is 420 [micro]mol/L (regardless of sex) in blood, so greater serum urate values can cause precipitation of urate crystals, thus resulting in their deposition in joint cavities and other tissues.