box

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box

(boks),
Container; receptacle.
[L.L. buxis, fr. G. puxis, box tree]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Informatics See Jukebox
Medspeak verb To place in a coffin after death
Microbiology See Glove box
Molecular biology noun A repeated oligonucleotide ‘motif’ seen in multiple sites along DNA, which functions as a signal for gene transcription or gene regulation
Meteorology A severe thunderstorm or tornado
Psychology See Skinner box
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

box(es)

a group of NUCLEOTIDES that form a sequence, usually a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE, with a known function. See for example PRIBNOW BOX, TATA BOX.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
IBM's Power servers topped a list of most reliable x86 and Unix machines in a new survey, clocking in at only 15 minutes of unplanned downtime per year.<p>Linux distributions running on x86 servers also performed well, as did Sun's Sparc machines and HP's Unix boxes. Windows Server machines performed worse than most competitors, with two to three hours of downtime per year, but have still improved dramatically over previous surveys.<p>"Ten to 15 years ago, there was a lot more downtime [for all types of servers]," says Laura DiDio, lead analyst with Information Technology Intelligence.
With boxes all over the planet squawking at each other in a multiplicity of operating system languages, developers writing workarounds trying to get UNIX boxes to talk to Windows and IBM mainframes, and programs adding their own voices to the PC Tower of Babel, there appeared an alternative.
Quest Software offers a variety of plug-ins that help UNIX boxes come under the control of Windows resources (such as Active Directory, Exchange, SharePoint, et al).
I think IBM is experiencing a nice uptick in server count because of the rapid adoption of its BladeCenter machines among its enterprise customers, which are more times than not offloading work from more expensive mainframe, iSeries, and Unix boxes to these very capable servers.
Typically, this consisted of proxy server software such as Netscape Proxy or Microsoft Proxy running on general-purpose Windows or Unix boxes. Administrators had to add separate applications piecemealed to enhance security, defend against viruses or filter or cache content.