unitarian

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unitarian

(ū-nĭ-tār′ē-ăn) [L. unitarius]
Composed of a single unit.
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However, it is equally possible to approach Williams's autobiography and then see him as participating in what one might loosely call a broad phenomenological rebellion against tradition that has little to do with Unitarianism or even American pragmatism.
For an account of how Arian Unitarians in America sidelined and sabotaged the Socinian Unitarianism imported by Priestley, see Jerome D.
A late summary statement "On the Religious Tradition" might have caught Eliot's eye, too, with its criticism of Unitarianism (in which Eliot had grown up) as neglectful of tradition, and of Protestantism as excluded from what is valuable in Catholic thought.
But, it's clear Keillor knows little or nothing about Unitarianism because of things he has said that make sport of its followers.
While Delano discusses Unitarianism, Transcendentalism, Associationism, and Fourierism, he does not explore the way in which these ideas, and not mundane misfortunes, were the true source of Brook Farm's ultimate demise.
36-40; Benny Kraut, "Judaism Triumphant: Isaac Mayer Wise on Unitarianism and Liberal Christianity," AJS Review Nos.
Rather than resort to paradox and contradiction, Very relates the irrational experience of conversion in the rationalist discourse of Lockean psychology appropriated by Unitarianism.
In addition to their biography of Servetus, and an account of the history of Unitarianism, authors Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone trace the histories of the three remaining copies from the date of their production to their final locations in contemporary library collections in Vienna, Paris, and Edinburgh.
After Coleridge had declaimed at considerable length on the evils of Unitarianism, Emerson reminded Coleridge 'when he stopped to take breath' (p.
Wright was particularly struck by this inherent spiritual quality in the everyday life and art of the Japanese and it would have been in keeping with his own ideals inspired by the Transcendentalists and his family's Unitarianism.
He envisaged more than 400 worshippers, back in a time when Unitarianism still attracted healthy congregations, but today there are no more than 50 members, of whom less than half are regular attenders.
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