Uniform Anatomical Gift Act


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Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

 
an act established in 1968 to standardize state laws on the donation of organs and tissues from cadavers; it is based on the premise that an individual should be able to control the disposition of his or her own body after death.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation in the US which allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death of all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, or organ transplantation, designated by a signed document—e.g., in a will or via a tick mark on one’s driver’s license.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation that allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death–all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, organ transplantation, by a signed document–eg, in a will or driver's license. See Brotherton v. Cleveland, Cadaver organ, Organ procurement, UNOS
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The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (hereinafter "UAGA") exists to ensure that donor organs are procured ethically by codifying the rights and duties of potential donors, as well as the rights and duties of organ transplant research and education professionals.
The United States Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (2006): New Challenges to Balancing Patient Rights and Physician Responsibilities, 2 Philos.
Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, reprinted in Statutory Regulation of Organ Donation in the United States (R.
Section 8(a) of the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act states that an individual's expressed intent to become a donor cannot be revoked by anyone other than the donor himself, and that obtaining the consent of any other person is not required or permitted.
46) The NCCUA issued the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act ("UAGA") in 1968, which was adopted in some form by all fifty states.
The administrators of our country's kidney allocation policies do not publicize or encourage donors to place any restrictions on the gift of their organs, even though it is legally possible to do so under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act.
When the revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) was adopted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in July 2006, the goal of the transplant community and the NCUSL drafting committee was to have it adopted by 25 states in the next two years.
They include; Sallop/AOPO Excellence in Leadership Award - Michael Hudson, Hospital Development Manager, Arkansas Regional Organ Recovery Agency, Little Rock; CryoLife/AOPO Achievement Award - Bryan Stewart, Director of Communications, OneLegacy in Los Angeles; AOPO Executive Director's Award - Shelly Kurtz, University of Iowa College of Law and Carlyle "Connie" Ring, for their work on revising the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA); AOPO President's Award - Charlie Alexander, President/CEO, Living Legacy Foundation, Baltimore, MD and Melissa Honohan, newly appointed Assistant Executive Director of AOPO.
When the first revision of the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) in 20 years was approved by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in June of 2006, it represented the first step in a long process to get it approved in all 50 states.
The revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act - In July the National Conference on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) adopted the first revised UAGA in 20 years.

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