Uniform Anatomical Gift Act


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Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

 
an act established in 1968 to standardize state laws on the donation of organs and tissues from cadavers; it is based on the premise that an individual should be able to control the disposition of his or her own body after death.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation in the US which allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death of all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, or organ transplantation, designated by a signed document—e.g., in a will or via a tick mark on one’s driver’s license.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation that allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death–all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, organ transplantation, by a signed document–eg, in a will or driver's license. See Brotherton v. Cleveland, Cadaver organ, Organ procurement, UNOS
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120) However, under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, doctors are supposed to defer to the expressed wishes of the deceased despite the wishes of any opposing family members:
The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act provides the legal framework for specification of one's wish to be an organ donor after death.
Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, reprinted in Statutory Regulation of Organ Donation in the United States (R.
In spite of this argument, the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act allows for living, biologically unrelated kidney donation and although UNOS does not actively encourage them, they happen.
The original Uniform Anatomical Gift Act was promulgated in 1968, shortly after Dr.
For the first time in almost 20 years the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) has undergone a major revision in order to facilitate organ donation by making the donation process uniform in all 50 US states.
In addition, directed donation is completely legal - the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, National Organ Transplant Act, and the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (OPTN) rules all allow directed donation - guaranteeing that the donor and donor family has a say in where the organ goes.
The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, the law that created the organ distribution network, allows individuals to designate a specific recipient.
Upholding the right of "first person consent" as legalized by the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA);
For example, it noted the state's Uniform Anatomical Gift Act provides "A person may not knowingly, for valuable consideration, purchase or sell a part for transplantation, therapy, or reconditioning, if removal of the part is intended to occur after the death of the decedent.
A decedent's right to donate takes precedence over the family consent according to the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA)," Metzger said.
First endorsed in 1968 by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (UCCUSL), the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) grants a mentally competent individual over the age of 18 the right to designate whether to donate his organs for transplantation upon his death.

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