Uniform Anatomical Gift Act


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Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

 
an act established in 1968 to standardize state laws on the donation of organs and tissues from cadavers; it is based on the premise that an individual should be able to control the disposition of his or her own body after death.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation in the US which allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death of all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, or organ transplantation, designated by a signed document—e.g., in a will or via a tick mark on one’s driver’s license.

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

Legislation that allows a person to make an anatomic gift at the time of death–all or part of the body for medical education, scientific research, organ transplantation, by a signed document–eg, in a will or driver's license. See Brotherton v. Cleveland, Cadaver organ, Organ procurement, UNOS
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The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (hereinafter "UAGA") exists to ensure that donor organs are procured ethically by codifying the rights and duties of potential donors, as well as the rights and duties of organ transplant research and education professionals.
(34.) See Uniform Anatomical Gift Act [section]2(a), reprinted in Statutory Regulation of Organ Donation in the United States, 4 (R.Hunter Manson ed., 2d ed.
Provisions of the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act of 1968[7]
[section] 274e(c)(l) (2006) (excluding the term gametes or ova specifically from the definition of a human organ); Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, [section] 1(7) (2006) (amended 2008) (defining the word "part" as "an organ, an eye, or tissue of a human being").
* Harmonizes concepts from Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Acts with Authorization Process.
In order to address these evolving ethical and legal issues created by organ donation, Congress enacted several legislative responses, primarily through the of the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act ("UAGA"), which are discussed below in further detail.
The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) created the legal power for individuals to donate organs and tissue in the United States.
"DoNotTransplant.com was created in response to changes in the 2006 Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) that make it easier to harvest Americans' body parts without their consent," said Mark Ferraro, Senior Vice President of DoNotTransplant.com, in a press release.
The administrators of our country's kidney allocation policies do not publicize or encourage donors to place any restrictions on the gift of their organs, even though it is legally possible to do so under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act. It is claimed that organ donations, when made anonymously as gifts to strangers, "affirm the solidarity of the community over and above the depersonalizing, alienating forces of mass society and market relations." [11] However, any argument that supports voluntary anonymous donation of blood, organs, or tissues on the basis of strengthening the solidarity and moral fiber of a society or community applies equally well to particular ethnic or racial communities.
When the revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) was adopted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in July 2006, the goal of the transplant community and the NCUSL drafting committee was to have it adopted by 25 states in the next two years.

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