ASCII

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ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A 7-bit binary computer code (from 0000000 through 1111111) that is the international standard for creating a set of 128 characters, including upper- and lower-case letters of English and other alphabets and various special, numeric and control characters and symbols. The ASCII format allows the translation of a character into a machine-readable numeric form, providing a “universal language” that enables otherwise incompatible systems to exchange data. ASCII files are readable by most computer systems.
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a string of Unicode characters at the end of the message.