microorganism

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microorganism

 [mi″kro-or´gah-nizm]
a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often classified as microorganisms, although they are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and they are unable to replicate without a host cell.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'gan-izm),
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

An organism detected by microscopy—e.g., viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites (protozoans).

microorganism

 A organism detected by microscopy–eg, viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites–protozoans; bug

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

or

microbe

any microscopic organism such as a BACTERIUM, FUNGUS, PROTOZOAN, microscopicALGA or member of the ARCHAEA.

Microorganism

An organism (life form) that is too small to be seen with the naked eye.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).
References in periodicals archive ?
Bruce Lipton offers powerful evidence of how much smarter and able unicellular organisms, whales, and cellular biology students become by working together.
Prokaryotes are unicellular organisms, including bacteria and archaea, that don't encase their DNA in a nucleus and do not contain membrane-bound organelles.
This ubiquitous molecule (it occurs in unicellular organisms, plants, fungi, and animals) seems to have a myriad of functions in humans; produced in the pineal gland, it has been "hypothesized as a hormone of darkness, free radical scavenger, chronobiotic and chronohypnotic, internal sleep facilitator, photoperiodic molecule, etc." (from the preface).
Cyanobacteria, found in rock fossil records that are approximately 3.6 billion years old, provide the earliest evidence of life in the form of complex unicellular organisms. Molecular phylogeny is the tool that enables us to understand life in all its complexity and recognise relationships between organisms.
Unicellular organisms, or "lower life forms," are considered to include a single cell, a cell cluster (e.g.
One recalls as well evolutionary biologist Lynn Margulis's assertion that sex developed as a result of certain primordial unicellular organisms' failure to entirely devour one another.
The summer's study focused on the interaction between the two amoeboid unicellular organisms, Dictyostelium and Foraminifera, and silicon chips etched with nanometer-sized trenches of which the width varied from the opening to the base.
But should a wasp fly in, and lets face it, at this time of year, that's not a ridiculous possibility, you'd think they'd regressed to unicellular organisms.
A tree based primarily on the visible characteristics of organisms would never do justice to the genetic diversity of the prokaryotes, or to the unicellular organisms that were at the base of the other branches.
The other property is that circadian rhythms appear to be generated at the cellular level, because the rhythms of unicellular organisms (e.g., algae or the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax) are much the same as rhythms of highly complex mammals.
Thermo Spectronic offers two models of FRENCH Pressure Cells and the Laboratory Press for the disintegration of chloroplast materials, blood cells, unicellular organisms, homogenates of animal tissue and other biological particles.
Prototheca species are aerobic, achlorophyllous, algaelike, unicellular organisms. The primary cell or spherule is known as the theca, and the appearance of the autospherulating theca has been termed mulberry-like endosporulation,[1] morula,[2] and frambasiform.[3] Prototheca were first recognized as human pathogens in 1964.[4] To date, 7 species of Prototheca have been identified, but only 2 have been associated with human disease, namely, Prototheca wicker-hamii and Prototheca zopfii.