unicameral

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unicameral

 [u″nĭ-kam´er-al]
having only one cavity or compartment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·o·loc·u·lar

(mon'ō-lok'yū-lăr),
Having one cavity or chamber.
Synonym(s): unicameral, unicamerate
[mono- + L. loculus, a small place]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mon·o·loc·u·lar

(mon'ō-lok'yū-lăr)
Having one cavity or chamber.
Synonym(s): unicameral, unicamerate.
[mono- + L. loculus, a small place]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
John McNees of Nome, however, a meteorologist and operator of a private transportation business with no prior background in government, (62) proceeded to make elaborate arguments in favor of unicameralism hoping to sway the body.
(69) While McNees's list was extensive, his reasons were primarily the virtues that reformers before him across the country had cited in advocating for unicameralism. (70) McNees failed to incorporate Alaska's peculiar needs (stemming from the state's small population, large territory, and developing economy) into his argument for unicameralism.
White, an Anchorage businessman who had served as the president of the Operation Statehood organization, (71) proclaimed that he was "on the fence" on the issue, yet he rose to say that he had "a feeling that a much better case can be made by more people for unicameralism than has been made tonight." (72) White argued that one of the territory's leading problems was sectionalism.
Stewart, a former mayor of Juneau now representing Sitka, (77) stated that he had attended almost all of the sessions of the territorial legislature and from these sessions, he had come to the conclusion that unicameralism might be an appropriate remedy for the ills of the old legislature.
(92) After three and a half hours, the debate concluded with four concerned citizens speaking, two in favor of bicameralism and two in favor of unicameralism. (93) The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported that one of those citizens, Niilo Koponen of Chena Ridge, himself a defeated candidate for delegate, "brought a howl of laughter when he drily stated, 'I never could see much sense in hiring two bunches of politicians who went off to two sides of the hall and argued twice on the same question." (94)
Though no formal vote was taken on the measure, thirty of the fifty-five delegates spoke on the matter, with only four expressing a preference for unicameralism and only two reporting being undecided.
Those in favor of unicameralism relied largely on political theory.
The delegates that spoke in favor of unicameralism came primarily from urban centers and probably recognized the risks of a new state senate allowing representatives of a minority of the population to control the government, as had occurred in the territorial legislature.
Unicameralism and the Twentieth Century Progressives
After Vermont's switch, unicameralism was primarily considered only by political theorists throughout the nineteenth century.
(123) In the aftermath of Nebraska's change, a new flurry of interest was stoked in unicameralism, with twelve state legislatures considering unicameral proposals in 1935 and twenty-one state legislatures considering such proposals in 1937; none of the states chose to adopt such a system.
Despite the Court's assurances, Reynolds has been used to support consideration of unicameralism during the past four decades, (130) with proponents arguing that bicameral systems are unnecessary and redundant if they cannot provide an increased voice to voters living in sparsely populated areas.