ungulate

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un·gu·late

(ŭng'gyū-lāt),
Having hooves.
[L. ungulatus, fr. ungula, hoof]

ungulate

(ŭng′gyə-lĭt, -lāt′)
n.
A hoofed mammal, such as a horse, pig, deer, buffalo, or antelope, belonging to the former order Ungulata, now divided into several orders including Artiodactyla and Perissodactyla.

un′gu·late adj.

ungulate

(ŭng′gyŭ-lāt″) [L. ungulatus, having claws or hooves]
1. Having or resembling hooves.
2. Pert. to hoofed mammals such as cattle, deer, elephants, horses, and swine, now classified among several taxonomic orders.
3. An ungulate mammal.

ungulate

a member of one of the numerous species of herbivorous mammals possessing hooves. See ARTIODACTYLA, e.g. pigs, cattle; PERISSODACTYLA, e.g. horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overgrazing of domestic livestock in the forest reduce resources of habitat accessible to wild ungulates, resulting in competition for space and food.
(1977) observed that ungulates between 20-1000 kg have similar maximum velocities (10-14 m/s), demonstrating that the similarity in limb proportions is related to shape in the functional biomechanics of the complete limb, where the increase of inertial forces due to size are not compensated by different structural design, keeping the same kinematics and reaching the same absolute velocities.
His research interests are bovine tuberculosis epidemiology in wild ungulates, disease ecology at the wildlife-livestock interface, and conservation physiology using carnivores and ungulates as research models.
Livestock and wild ungulates spatial data collected during November 2012 aerial census was obtained from the Department of Resources Survey and Remote Sensing (DRSRS), a Kenyan government department mandated with collecting, storing, analyzing, updating, and disseminating geospatial information on natural resources.
2017); however, only few try to predict the amount of forage available to wild ungulates seasonally.
The scaling of ruminoreticulum size with body weight in East African ungulates. Afr.
He also said that the exchange of ideas would benefit the drafting of policies, that are necessary for the protection of mountain ungulates, which in many cases are endangered species.
The use of stereoscopic photography to estimate browse use by large ungulates. Northwest Science 84:103-108.
Conservation of mountain ungulates also promotes the conservation of populations of other species, rare animals such as the snow leopard," said the GIZ.