undue hardship


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undue hardship

Social medicine A term used in the context of the ADA, in which an employer may claim that the accommodations required to comply with the ADA are financially unviable and represent an undue hardship. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Environmental tobacco smoke. Cf Universal design.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although we are legally allowed to disconnect the bulk supply to the Municipality in total, we are weary of the fact that it may cause undue hardship to consumers and members of the community.
In order to avoid undue hardship, a facilitating provision is being finalised for the vehicles in transit only as a one-time dispensation,' the ministry said in an official statement.
In order to avoid undue hardship, a facilitating provision is being finalized for the vehicles in transit only as a one-time dispensation.
Although a lofty threshold, if outstanding student-loan debt would present the debtor with undue hardship after filing for bankruptcy, a bankruptcy court may discharge the debt.
Conway filed a motion to reopen her case, which was granted, in order to determine whether her non-dischargeable student loans could be discharged under the undue hardship exception of the Bankruptcy Code.
13) The lack of a congressional definition of undue hardship also led to a profusion of judge-made law, with a consensus definition still out of reach today.
It requires employers to provide disabled employees or applicants for employment with reasonable accommodations unless doing so would cause an undue hardship.
The miners' strikes were largely ineffective and led to Rhondda families suffering undue hardship.
Casper rejected that argument and ruled instead that granting Robinson a total exemption from the vaccine would have caused undue hardship for the hospital by jeopardizing patients' health.
Mhairi has pointed out that this will cause undue hardship to thousands of women.
It assists the most vulnerable groups, who would face undue hardship without social assistance, including: the elderly living alone, families supported by unmarried women, persons with disabilities, and large families.
Under the law, an undue hardship means it cannot be done or is outrageously expensive, so the bigger the employer, the less likely undue hardship will be a winning argument.