hydrophone

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hydrophone

[hī′drəfōn]
a small-diameter probe with a piezoelectric element, usually about 0.5 mm in diameter, at one end. When placed in an ultrasound beam, the hydrophone produces an electric signal.
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E[acute accent]A hydrophone is an underwater microphone that is slightly larger than a AA battery and is used by geophysicists to locate oil and gas deposits beneath the ocean floor.
Although researchers in the past have detected reef sounds from many miles away, Kaplan said that most of those studies rely on a hydrophone, an underwater microphone, which can detect only pressure waves.
A GeoPoint seismic hydrophone is an underwater microphone that is slightly larger than a AA battery and is used by geophysicists to locate oil and gas deposits beneath the ocean floor.
Washington, June 24 (ANI): Inspired by the extraordinarily acute hearing of marine mammal orcas, Stanford researchers have developed a highly sensitive underwater microphone.
A GeoPoint hydrophone is an underwater microphone that is slightly larger than a AA battery and is used by geophysicists to locate oil and gas deposits beneath the ocean floor.
Battery-powered and exceptionally quiet, the gliders are equipped with an underwater microphone on their undersides and iridium satellite antennas on their tail sections.
To keep up with their very latest crazes, you need an underwater microphone and a discerning ear.
Made obsolete by the greater call capacity of fiber optic lines, the 3+year-old cable now buzzes 300 watts of electricity from Oahu to a seismometer and an underwater microphone, two of the first instruments plugged into what's known as the Hawaii-2 Observatory.
Although unsuitable for use as the skin of a sonar-evading submarine, this "alumer" composite may prove useful as an acoustically transparent backing plate that supports but doesn't interfere with, say, an underwater microphone.
Pressure waves are relatively simple to detect using common underwater microphones called hydrophones.
On recording the sound the using underwater microphones called hydrophones, the team found that these fish can make sounds up to 192 decibels - enough to damage your eardrums if it were on land.
They're using underwater microphones to track the animals so ships can avoid hitting them.

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