Ultralente

Ultralente

a trademark for an insulin zinc suspension.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of subcutaneous injection of long-acting human insulin analog glargine, NPH insulin, and ultralente human insulin and continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin lispro.
While older intermediate-acting insulins such as semilente, lente and ultralente have been discontinued,1 newer basal analogues as glargine, determir and degludec are now available (Table-1).
A potential major advantage of insulin glargine over NPH insulin and ultralente preparations is a lack of pronounced peaks in plasma insulin concentrations and a more constant delivery of insulin over a 24 hour period.
Traditional intermediate- and long-acting insulins (NPH insulin, lente insulin, and ultralente insulin) are limited by inconsistent absorption and peaks of action that may result in hypoglycemia.
5 hours Glulisine (Apidra[R]) 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours 6-10 hours Regular NPH/Lente 1-2 hours 4-8 hours 10-18 hours Ultralente 2-4 hours 8-14 hours 18-24 hours Glargine (Lantus[R]) 1-2 hours No peak 24 hours Detemir (Levemir[R]) Source: Lilley, Harrington, & Snyder, 2007.
The most effective combination for type 1 diabetics is insulin lispro plus Ultralente, Dr.
Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of subcutaneous injection long-acting human insulin analogue glargine, NPH insulin and ultralente human insulin and continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin lispro.
is to inject ultralente insulin 28 units subcutaneously and 5 units of regular insulin.
Half of the patients took inhaled insulin before meals in addition to a single shot of ultralente insulin at bedtime.
Initial studies have shown that Lantus reduced severely low blood sugars by about 30%, compared with using NPH, Lente, and Ultralente insulins.